Abcess Root (Polemonium reptans): It is used almost exclusively in the treatment of pulmonary diseases

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

 

 

Abcess Root (Polemonium reptans):  This is mostly used in the treatment of pulmonary diseases. It is a powerful diaphoretic and even in small doses will cause excessive sweating in the patient. This herb is an antiseptic as well as an astringent and will quickly heal an ulcerated throat and soothe an inflamed bronchial mucosa. One of its main use is as an expectorant removing mucous from the lungs and bronchi and with a vasodilative action, it makes breathing easier.

 

Acacia Bark (Acacia decurrens): A very strong astringent, it is used to contract and toughen mucous membranes throughout the body in the same way as oak bark or witch hazel works. It may be used to prepare a lotion for bleeding gums, a gargle for sore throats, a wash for eczema as well as an eyewash for conjunctivitis and other eye problems. It can also make a douche for persistent vaginal discharge. Taken internally it can be used to treat diarrhea, mainly in the form of a decoction and has been used to help in the treatment of premature ejaculation.

 

Acacia, Sweet (Acacia farnesiana ): In certain countries of South America a bath made from the bark is used as a treatment for typhoid fever. People have chewed on the roots which is gummy as a cure for sore throat. An extraction from the bark of this tree has been used for treating diarrhea. An infusion from the flowers is used as a relief for digestive problems. The flowers mixed with an ointment can be used for treating headaches and the powdered dry leaves have been applied to external wounds. Boil the green pods down in water and use the liquid to treat dysentery and inflammation of the skin. An infusion from the dry pods can be used to treat sore throat, diarrhea, and conjunctivitis.

 

Aconite (Aconiturn napellus): Aconite is poisonous except in minute doses and is very rarely prescribed for internal use. Its most common use is in the treatment of bruises and neurological conditions. Aconite is also used to treat neuralgia, asthma and heart weakness. It has a painkilling action and therefore is used in ointments for neuralgia, lumbago and rheumatism. The tincture has been given in doses of no more than one-drop for heart failure, high fever, pneumonia, pleurisy and tonsillitis. It must only be used under professional supervision.

 

Adam and Eve Root (Aplectrum hyemale): This is not enough to be reaped but it is sometimes used in folk remedies. It is admired as a showpiece but the root has been used to treat bronchial problems.

 

Adder’s Tongue (Erythronium americanum): This is normally used to make a poultice for sore or inflamed parts of the body. The leaves when infused can be taken for enlarged glands or minor skin problems while ointments and oil extracts which include the spikes can be used for treating wounds. The bulbs of the plant have been known to cause vomiting and can be used to treat gout. In the fresh state it has been known to cure scurvy. The expressed juice can be mixed with cider to treat small granular tumors and the attendant skin problems. It must be used fresh.

 

 

Adder Tongue, English (Ophioglossum vulgatum): The fresh leaves make a good and healing poultice for ulcers and tumors. The juice of the leaves is drunk for internal bleeding and bruising.

Adonis (Adonis vernalis): The leaves and tops contain a number of biologically active compounds. Some of these are cardioactive glycosides that helps the heart by dilating the coronary vessels. They are similar to, but gentler than those found in foxglove. These substances increase the efficiency of the heart by increasing its output while at the same time slowing its rate. It is also used for mitral stenosis and edema due to heart failure. False hellebore is recommended as a treatment for certain cases of low blood pressure. False hellebore is strongly diuretic and can be used to counter water retention, particularly if this condition can be attributed to poor circulatory function. It is an ingredient of several commercial German preparations for heart complaints and low blood pressure. It is also found in Bechterew’s Mixture, a Russian formulation for heart conditions of nervous origin.

 

Agar (Gelidium amansii ): Agar is nutritious and contains large amounts of mucilage like most seaweeds and their derivatives. For medicinal purposes it is mainly used as a bulk laxative. It stimulates bowel activity with the subsequent elimination of feces. It is principally used in scientific cultures and for commercial activities.

 

Agrimony (Agrimonia eupatoria): Agrimony has been used since olden days to heal wounds because it stops the flow of blood and initiates clot formation. It was also used as a battlefield remedy for gunshot wounds. It is mildly bitter and can be used for conditions like diarrhea, bronchitis and a tonic for the digestive system. It is contained in remedies for cystitis, sore throat, urinary incontinence, arthritis, rheumatism and kidney stones. In conjunction with cocoa butter it can be made into a suppository. The herb has a high silica content which is responsible for its healing characteristic. For satisfactory results the plant must be used over a period of time. Taken on a daily basis it has been known to heal peptic ulcers and colitis. It also controls diarrhea, peps up the digestive tract lining and improve the assimilation of food. It has been shown to reduce excessive bile production in gallbladder cases.

 

Ajowan (Carum ajowan): In the Middle East, Ajowan water is often used for diarrhea and flatulence. In India the seeds are used as a home remedy for asthma and indigestion. It has a high thymol content and consequently it is a strong germicide, anthelmintic, fungicide and anti-spasmodic. Ajowain leaves used on a regular basis, appears to prevent kidney stone formation and is reputed to be an aphrodisiac.

Ajowain is a good remedy for relieving spasmodic stomach pains. For colicky pain due to flatulence, indigestion and infections in the intestines, relief can be had by taking one teaspoonful of ajowan along with 2-3 pinches of common salt in warm water. Use half the dose in children. It can be mixed with buttermilk or cream as an antacid. It can also be used for asthma and bronchitis.

 

Akebia (Akebia trifoliata): It is a very strong diuretic because of the high content of potassium salts. It is a very bitter herb that can be used to control fungal and bacterial infections. Used for circulatory, urinary, and female organs stimulation it shows effective results. It can be used internally for rheumatoid arthritis, urinary tract infections, menstrual problems and insufficient breast milk.

 

Alder Buckthorn (Rhamnus frangula, Frangula alnus): Alder Buckthorn is a laxative and a cathartic, and is most commonly used to treat chronic constipation. In its dry form it is milder than Senna or common Buckthorn and can be a long-term treatment for constipation as well as treatment for poor bile flow or weak colon muscles. The fresh bark powdered and mixed with vinegar is a treatment for fungal skin diseases and acne.

Alexanders (Smyrnium olusatrum): The plant was used long ago to relieve dropsy, and as a source of vitamin C. These uses have been discontinued.

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa): Medicinally, this herb is used to stop bleeding, as a laxative, as a diuretic, for arthritis and to aid in blood clotting. It is an excellent source of Vitamins A, D, and K and is used in baby cereals. In Europe it is used to make a tea for wasting diseases. Other uses that Alfalfa can be put to are for asthma, hay fever and lowering blood cholesterol. A tea made from alfalfa and raspberry leaves is a good drink for pregnant women or when sulfa or antibiotic drugs are taken.

Allspice (Pimenta dioica): Allspice  is mainly used as an aromatic stimulant and carminative. It is used to treat flatulence, indigestion and hysterical paroxysm. It can be found in stomach medicines and purgatives.

   

Almond (Prunus communis):  About 5% of prussic acid is found in essential oil distilled from Bitter Almonds. Almond oil processed from Almonds is used for cosmetic purposes and is helpful in relieving itchy skin conditions like eczema. It is a sedative and is sometimes used in cough medicines. It is a favorite with masseuses and aroma therapists because it is light and blends easily with other oils. For heartburn and as a tonic, almond milk is recommended. The good taste of almond is generally accepted and it is reputed to help in the treatment of gallstones, kidney stones and constipation. The seed is demulcent, emollient, laxative, nutritive and pectoral. The seeds contain vitamin B17. The leaves are used to treat diabetes and the plant contains Taxifolin an anti-tumor compound.

Aloe (Aloe barbadensis): Commercial aloe juice is made from the inner leaf, with a preservative added. This juice is thickened with seaweed to get the same consistency as the original gel to make “aloe gel”.  A laxative is made from the brown gel found alongside the leaves. The commercial juice or gel does not contain this laxative and therefore is soothing to digestive tract irritations such as colitis and peptic ulcers. Over the counter products that contain  Aloe have been used to relieve itching, rashes, burns, sunburn, eczema and ringworm. Leg ulcerations and acne respond favorably. As a folk medicine Aloe is used for rheumatism, arthritis, and the control of blood sugar levels.   

Aloewood (Aquilaria malaccensis): The bark/wood is used internally for bronchial and digestive complaints, rheumatism and fever. The powdered wood of the Aloe tree provides a skin tonic and a gentle antiseptic for open wounds and eye and ear infection.

Alstonia (Alstonia scolaris, A constricta): There are 43 species of alstonia trees.  The bark of the tree is used medicinally in the Pacific Rim and India.  Constricta, originated in Australia, and is widely used by the natives for fever, chronic diarrhea, dysentery and rheumatism. Scholaris, mostly grown in Pakistan, India and the Philippines, is used for the same purposes, but is also used against malaria, the expelling of intestinal worms and is considered an aphrodisiac. It is used by powdering the bark and making it into a tea.

Alumroot (Heuchera americana):  Contains about 20% of its weight in tannins, acid compounds that serve to shrink swollen, moist tissues. Dried and powdered it is used as a tonic and to stop minor bleeding and reduce inflammation. It is also used to stop dysentery and to make a gargle for sore throat.  .

Amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus): It is a nutritional supplement and tonic. An infusion of this herb is used for diarrhea, as a mouthwash for sore gums and to heal canker sores and ulcers. It is also used to check excessive menstrual flow and excessive vaginal discharge.  

Ambrette Seed (Abelmoschus moschatus (syn Hibiscus abelmoschus)): Internally the seeds are used as a digestive and breath-freshener. The oil is used for cramps, poor circulation and aching joints. In aromatherapy it is used for anxiety and depression. 

American Centuary (Sabatia angularis): This herb, when gathered in full bloom is a stimulating tonic with relaxing properties. Its main effect is on the spleen, gall-ducts and stomach. When taken cold, it increases the appetite in weak stomach conditions. It is also used in the treatment of indigestion.

 

American Cranesbill: American cranesbill is used as an astringent and clotting agent. It is sometimes prescribed for irritable bowel syndrome and hemorrhoids. It may also be used in cases of heavy menstrual bleeding and excessive vaginal discharge. A powder made from it is effective in stopping bleeding from wounds, the nostril, or from tooth extraction. It is a safe and effective herb for gastrointestinal problems.

American Ginseng (Panax quinquefolius): Similar to Panax ginseng only milder

 

American White Hellebore (Veratrum viride): It is used for its irritant and sedative action in many complaints some of which are pneumonia, gout, rheumatism, typhoid and rheumatic fevers and local inflammations. Because it contains a number of steroid alkaloids it is used to treat severe cases of high blood pressure and its attendant cardiovascular problems. It has been used in cases of acute pneumonia and peritonitis. The root has been used to treat chronic coughs, constipation and stomach pains as well as making a skin wash and compress for fractures, sprains, bruises and general aches and pains.

 

American Larix (Larix laricina):  This is used to treat jaundice, anemia, rheumatism, colds, skin ailments, piles and diarrhea. It makes a good poultice for sores, swellings and burns. As a gargle it is used for sore throats. An infusion of the buds and bark makes an expectorant and it may also be used as a treatment in lung and kidney problems.

 

American Speedwell (Veronica americana): American speedwell is primarily used as an expectorant tea, which is said to help move bronchial congestion and make coughing more productive.  It also has astringent and diuretic qualities.

 

Ammoniacum (Dorema ammoniacum): For thousands of years, Ammoniacum has been used in Western herbal medicine, mainly for respiratory problems. It has been used for the relief of catarrh, asthma, and bronchitis. It is used externally for swollen joints and slow tumors. It is sometimes used to induce sweating or menstruation.. It is still listed in the British Pharmacopoeia as an antispasmodic and an expectorant that stimulates the coughing up of thick mucus.

 

Angelica (Angelica archangelica): As an expectorant, this herb is a good treatment for coughs, bronchitis and pleurisy especially when any of these is in conjunction with fever, influenza or colds. It can be used as a digestive agent to stimulate appetite and to ease intestinal colic and flatulence. It has also been used to ease menstrual problems, to relieve muscle spasms and ease rheumatic inflammations. A salve made from it is useful in treating chronic rhinitis and sinusitis.

 

Angostura (Galipea officinalis): Angostura is very bitter with tonic properties.  It is antispasmodic and stimulates the digestive tract and stomach. Angostura is used as a remedy for Diarrhea and dysentery. In South America, it is sometimes used to control fevers.

 

Anise (Pimpenella anisum): Anise is used to treat colic and flatulence and is an expectorant. It is widely used in treating asthma, bronchitis, insomnia, nausea and cholera. Women use it to promote breast milk and to relieve menopausal discomfort. It is also a good source of Iron.

 

Anise Hyssop: The root of anise hyssop was an ingredient in North American Chippewa Indian lung formulas, and the Cree sometimes carried the flowers in their medicine bundles. The Cheyenne employed an infusion of the leaves for colds, chest pains from coughing and a weak heart.  The leaves in a steam bath were used to induce sweating; and powdered leaves on the body for high fevers.

 

Annatto: An astringent infusion made from the annatto leaves and root is used to treat fevers, dysentery and epilepsy. It is considered to be an aphrodisiac. The seed pulp is used in the food industry for coloring foods as well as medicine. It can also be used as an antidote for certain poisons and also for treating fresh burns to reduce blistering.

 

Antelope Horn (Asclepias viridis):  The root soaked in cold water is used for treating fever. The powdered root is rubbed over the heart area to relieve palpitations. It is also made into a poultice to treat neck and rib pains. Relief from asthma and shortness of breath can also be achieved by drinking a tea made from it.

 

Apache Plume (Fallugia paradoxa): The root harvested in the fall and boiled in water is used for coughs and as a hair rinse to promote growth and tone up the hair. A tea made from the young twigs may be used for indigestion.

 

Apricot (Prunus armeniaca): Apricot is a nutritious fruit with a mildly laxative effect. The kernels contain highly toxic prussic acid. They also produce oil which is used in the cosmetic industry. An antidote made from the bark/root is used for treating poisoning caused by ingesting bitter almond or apricot seeds which contain hydrogen cyanide. The decoction is also used to soothe inflamed and irritated skin, asthma, persistent coughs, acute bronchitis and constipation.

 

Arbutus, Trailing (Epigaea repens):  This is considered one of the most effective relief for urinary disorders especially when the urine contains pus or blood and there is a degree of irritation. It is highly recommended for the elderly. It has been found to be one of the most effective remedies for prostatitis, cystitis, urethritis and bladder stones. It is also used for treating excess uric acid.

 

Areca Nut (Areca catechu): The seeds are used to destroy intestinal parasites from man and animals as well as treating dysentery and malaria. The rind is used as a laxative  in constipation where there is bloating caused by flatulence. The dried nut is powdered and used as an ingredient in tooth powders. Because of its mild toxic properties it should be taken with a purgative.

 

Arnica (Arnica montana): Used externally, Arnica promotes the healing of wounds and is anti-inflammatory and antiseptic. A tincture made from Arnica can be used to cleanse and dress wounds, boils, abscesses and sores. Packs of the diluted tincture can be used to treat contusions, sprains, bruises, bursitis, arthritis and inflammation of the lymphatic vessels. Apply compresses around the neck and head to relieve visual problems and headaches. Arnica has been used in heart problems to improve circulation and reduce cholesterol, but this should only be done under medical supervision.

Arrach (Chenopodium olidum): An infusion of the dried leaves is used in the treatment of hysteria and nervous troubles connected with women's ailments.

 

Arrowleaf Balsamroot (Balsamorrhiza sagittata): The root of the plant is sometimes used as an expectorant and a treatment for tuberculosis and whooping cough. Applied as a poultice it can be used to treat wounds, cuts, bruises and hard to heal wounds. Taken internally it is widely used to enhance the immune system.

 

Arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea): The starch from the root of this plant becomes gelatinous when mixed with hot water and is used to soothe irritated mucous membranes. It helps in the relief of acidity, indigestion and colic. It is widely used in the manufacturing industry.

 

Artichoke (Cynara scolymus):  It is eaten to drop cholesterol levels and increase bile production as well as being a diuretic. It has been recommended in the treatment of gallbladder problems, nausea, indigestion and abdominal distension. It provides good results for diabetics in the lowering of blood sugar.

 

Asafetida (Ferula assa-foetida): Asafetida is considered to have antispasmodic properties. It has laxative, expectorant, and sedative properties. It has been proven to act as a local stimulant for mucous membranes, especially that of the alimentary canal. Used as a carminative it has shown great relief in flatulent colic and as a laxative. It has also been used for whooping cough, asthma, bronchitis and flatulent colic in infants.

Asarabacca (Asarum europaeum): A strong emetic and is rich in flavonoids. If sniffed up the nostril violent sneezing and a heavy flow of mucus will result. It has been used for headaches, drowsiness, giddiness, catarrhs and other cases of congestion.

 

Ash (Fraxinus excelsior): Decoctions made from the bark and leaves are a gentle laxative. If taken on a regular basis it is said to prevent the recurrence of malaria. It is considered as a treatment for arthritis and flatulence.

 

Ashwagandha: It is used as a restorative medicine for chronically ill people and the elderly. It helps to stabilize the fetus in weak pregnant women. Also helpful in  promoting healing in wounds and sores. It is also used in adrenal problems, anemia, anorexia, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, diarrhea, hypertension, erectile dysfunction, indigestion and insomnia.

 

Asmatica (Tylophora asmatica): It is generally used as a remedy for asthma. Some people have been known to get relief for up to three months. Additionally it is used for hay fever and other allergic problems. It may also be used for rheumatoid arthritis and disorders of the immune system.

 

Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis): Asparagus is very nutritious and is high in folic acid. A tea brewed from the mature fern is used to treat rheumatic and urinary disorders. The root is used for treating dryness of the throat, consumptive diseases, tuberculosis and sputum containing blood. It can also be used for treating the kidneys and for lower back pains.

 

Astragalus (Astragalus membranaceous): It is used to aid digestion, improve metabolism, and strengthen the immune system and helps in the healing of wounds and other injuries. It treats chronic lung problems, prolapse of internal organs, chronic lesions and nephritis.  It is helpful in increasing the white blood cell count.          

Avens: Avens is an astringent herb, used mostly for problems of the mouth, throat and gastrointestinal tract.  It firms up soft gums, heals canker sores, and makes a good gargle for infections of the pharynx and larynx. It also reduces irritation of the stomach and gut.  Avens is recommended for the treatment of peptic ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, diarrhea, and dysentery. It has been used as a lotion or ointment to treat hemorrhoids and as a douche; it can be used for treating excessive vaginal discharge

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

Ba Ji Tian (Morinda officinalis): Bi Ji Tian is a sweet tasting Chinese herb. It is used as a sexual tonic for treating premature ejaculation and impotence in men, infertility in both men and women and other conditions such as irregular menstruation. It is also helpful for problems of the lower back or pelvic region, including pain and urinary weakness such as frequent urination or incontinence.

Bael (Aegle marmelos) The half-ripe fruit is used to reduce irritation in the digestive tract and offers very good treatment for diarrhea and dysentery. When fully ripe it is used as a laxative. It has a high vitamin C content and promotes a healthy stomach function. The leaves are used to treat peptic ulcers and it is sometimes used to treat fever and influenza.  

Bai Zhi (Angelica dahurica): Bai Zhi is mostly used in Chinese herbal medicine where it is used to induce sweating. It is used for frontal headaches, nasal congestion, toothache, painful eyes and neuralgia. It increases breathing, increases blood pressure, decreases the pulse rate, increases the secretion of saliva and induces vomiting. Large doses can cause convulsions and general paralysis.  

Bai Zhu (Atractylodes macrocephala): Bai Zhu is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine as a tonic for the digestive system and strengthening the spleen. The rhizome is used to relieve fluid retention, excessive sweating, diarrhea, vomiting, poor appetite, dyspepsia, abdominal distension and edema.   

Baical Skullcap (Scutellaria baicalensis): The root is used for thirst with no desire for water, dysentery, diarrhea, and jaundice, blood in the stool and sputum and nosebleeds. It can also be used for asthma, hay fever, eczema, rashes and painful urinary conditions. Circulatory conditions that are caused by diabetes can also be treated by this.

 Balloon Flower (Platycodon grandiflorum): It is used to loosen phlegm and stop coughing. Also effective for sore throats, lung abscess, laryngitis and aids in the elimination of pus in the upper part of the body.

Balloon Vine (Cardiospermum halicacabum):  Balloon vine root is used to bring on delayed menstruation and to relieve backache and arthritis. The leaves are applied to painful joints. It can also be used to treat piles, rheumatism, nervous disorders and chronic bronchitis. A dressing for sores and wounds can also be made from the leaves. The seeds are used to relieve body aches and fever.   

Balmony (Chelone glabra):   Balmony is a very bitter herb with a flavor similar to tea and is taken as a tonic for the liver and digestive system. It stimulates the appetite, is an anti-depressant and is a laxative. Used internally, it treats consumption, debility, liver diseases, gallbladder problems and gallstones, nausea, vomiting, intestinal colic and to expel worms. An ointment made from it is used to relieve inflamed tumors, inflamed breasts and irritable ulcers.

 

Balsam Fir (Abies balsamea): The Balsam Fir produces a resin that is widely used as an antiseptic and healing agent. It is used to cover burns, wounds, bruises and sores. It is also good for sore nipples and sore throat. A tea made from the needles is sometimes used for asthma, colds, and fever. Taken in excess it is a purgative.

 

Barberry (Berberis vulgaris): Barberry’s strong antiseptic properties make it ideal for treating amebic dysentery, cholera and similar gastrointestinal infections. By acting on the gallbladder it improves the flow of bile and eases conditions such as gallbladder pain, gallstones, and jaundice. It is a very good liver tonic and is used for hepatitis and diabetes. It has very good infection-fighting properties and is therefore used to kill microorganisms that cause diarrhea, dysentery, cholera, urinary tract infections and vaginal yeast infection. It exhibits highly advantageous effects on the digestive system as a whole. Conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, wounds, cuts, bruises, enlarged spleen and malaria have all been successfully treated with Barberry.

 

Basil (Ocimum basilicum): Basil has been used to treat stomach, kidney and blood conditions, colds, warts and intestinal worms. The juice is recommended as a general tonic and for treating chills, coughs, skin problems and earaches. It contains Vitamin A & C. The oil soothes the stomach and is a treatment for a wide range of intestinal ailments as well as irritable skin conditions and rheumatic pain.

        

Bay (Laurus nobilis): Bay leaves are antiseptic and were once used for treating liver disorders and to stimulate digestion. An oil made from the berries and leaves can be added to an ointment or liniment for rheumatism, bruises and skin disorders. It has been demonstrated that Bay leaves help the body to use Insulin more effectively and can be helpful in colds and chest problems.

Bayberry (Myrica cerifera):  Bayberry herb is used internally for fevers, colds, influenza, excess mucus, diarrhea, colitis, excessive menstruation and vaginal discharge. Externally it is used for sore throat, ulcers, sores, itching skin conditions, and dandruff and hair loss. It is also used to increase circulation, stimulate perspiration, and keep bacterial infections under control.  The leaves contain Vitamin C.

 

Bearsfoot (Polymnia uvedalia):  It is considered as useful for quick pain relief and is a stimulant and mild laxative suitable for the elderly. The root is used internally as a treatment for non-malignant swollen glands and especially for mastitis and has beneficial effect on the stomach, liver and spleen.

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Belladonna (Atropa belladonna): Atropine is made from belladonna and is used for dilating the eyes for examinations or operations. It is also used to relax distended organs, especially the stomach and intestines thereby relieving colic and pain. It can be used to treat peptic ulcers and the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

Bergamot (Bergamot didyma): Bergamot tea is soothing and relaxing and is usually taken as a night-time drink. The fresh leaves added to your bath will soothe tired and aching limbs. As a tea, it is good for colds and flu and if inhaled when hot, will relieve sinus and lung congestion. Mixed with other herbs it can be used to treat urinary tract infections and indigestion.

Bethroot (Trillium erectum): Is an antiseptic, astringent and tonic expectorant which is used principally in hemorrhages, to promote childbirth, and externally as a poultice to fight off gangrene. It can also be used against diarrhea, dysentery, heavy menstrual bleeding and vaginal discharge and yeast infections.

 

Betony (Stachys officinalis):  Most of the drugs is found in the leaves and this is used for treating headaches and facial pain, nervous stress and tension, as well as for lung, liver, gallbladder and spleen problems. Used externally it can stop bleeding, promotes healing and draws out boils and splinters.         

Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus): If the fruits and roots are steeped in gin it can be used to stop diarrhea. It can guard against blood clots and it is a valuable treatment for varicose veins, hemorrhoids and capillary fragility. It may be useful in the prevention and treatment of glaucoma.

Birthwort (Aristolochia clematitis): It is not used much these days but in the past has been usd to treat leg ulcers, menstrual problems, tumors, sores, and abdominal problems. It has also been taken after childbirth to guard against infection. It is known to have been used to produce abortions. It is also indicated for asthma and bronchitis.

 

Birthwort, Frail (Aristolochia debilis): The roots are used to treat arthritis, hypertension, snake and insects bites, and gastric disorders. The fruits are used for  asthma, coughs, bronchitis,  hypertension and hemorrhoids.

 

Biscuit Root (Lomatium dissectum):  In olden days this was used to combat chronic or severe infectious diseases especially those of a viral nature. Not much work has been done on it in recent years but there is some indication that it may be useful in treating viral infections like HIV. It acts as an expectorant and is used for treating lung problems including tuberculosis. Because of its anti-infection properties it can be used as a gargle for throat infections, as a douche for bacterial infections, and for cuts and bruises.     

Bishop’s Weed (Ammi majur): The seeds are diuretic and have been used to treat asthma, angina, psoriasis and patchy skin pigmentation as in vitiligo.

 

Bistort (Polygonum bistorta or Persicaria bistorta):  Roots and leaves are used as an antidote and for malaria and other fevers. It is also used to staunch bleeding from wounds and taken internally for internal bleeding, diarrhea and dysentery. It has also been used externally for vaginal discharges, hemorrhoids, gum diseases and sore mouth.

 

Bitter Root (Apocynum andosaemifolium): Bitter Root is a strong diuretic and emetic but is safe as a cathartic and heart tonic. Taken in small doses it slows and strengthens the heartbeat and raises the blood pressure. It is a stimulant to the gall ducts to excrete more bile and has also been used to treat heart and kidney problems.

           

Bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara): Internally it is used for skin diseases, ulcers, eczema, psoriasis, warts, ulcerative colitis and inflammatory rheumatic diseases. It is also used for high fever accompanied by excitability and is a sedative for anxiety. Other uses are for asthma, chronic bronchitis, and gout.

 

Black Catechu (Acacia catechu): Black Catechu is used in chronic diarrhea, dysentery and mucous colitis.  It is also a clotting agent. It helps to reduce excess mucus in the nose, vagina or the large bowels and is a treatment for eczema and hemorrhages. A mouthwash made from it is used for gingivitis, stomatitis, laryngitis, bleeding gums and cancer sores. It is also used to lower blood pressure.

    

Black Cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa) The root of Black Cohosh improves blood circulation and lowers blood pressure and body temperature by dilating blood vessels and increasing peripheral circulation. Because the root is very resinous, hot water or alcohol is used to extract the useful properties from the fresh roots. It is used as a treatment for ringing in the ears and to enhance labor. Other uses are for easing the inflammation and muscular pain of rheumatism and inflammatory arthritis, especially in cases undergoing menopause and for problems of the respiratory system.      . 

Black Haw: (Viburnum prunifolium): Black Haw is a powerful relaxant of the uterus and is used for dysmenorrheal and false labor pains. It is used to treat blood pressure, asthma and to improve circulation to the ovaries and uterus. Also used to treat palpitations,  hysterical fits, nervous complaints like convulsions, hysteria and spasms, it has been helpful in treating painful conditions like arthritis and rheumatism. Taken during late pregnancy it helps with uterine contractions, prevents after pains and post partum hemorrhage.           

Black Hellebore (Helleborus niger): The active constituents are now considered too strong to be safely used. It has been used in the past however, in small doses, to expel worms, promote menstrual flow and as a heart stimulant.

Blessed Thistle (Cnicus benedictus):  Blessed Thistle is used to treat liver disorders, as well as menstrual problems. It stimulates the appetite and is used to increase mother’s milk. It destroys infection and is used as a dressing for wounds and ulcers. 

Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis): Bloodroot has been used as a diuretic, emetic, expectorant, stimulant, and tonic. It has also been used in a number of topical preparations for the treatment of various skin cancers, sores, warts, eczema, and other skin problems. Internally it has been used to treat congestive lung conditions like chronic bronchitis and emphysema. It is an active ingredient in some toothpaste and mouthwash.

Blue Cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides): It is used to reduce labor pains, painful menstruation, stomach cramps, arthritis, rheumatism, and a relief for chronic yeast infections. It constricts blood vessels, stimulates the small intestines, and causes hyperglycemia. It is used against tears or other damage of the reproductive system, chronic reproductive infections, growths or fibroids, and it promotes fertility.

Bogbean (Menyanthes trifoliate): Used for treating rheumatism, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, Bogbean is a most useful herb. It should not be used for rheumatism when diarrhea or colitis is present. It can be used to increase the appetite, help in indigestion and problems of the liver and gall-bladder. It is used to treat muscle weakness and chronic infections which cause debility and exhaustion. Glandular swellings have benefited from treatment with Bogbean.      

Boldo Leaf (Peumus boldus): Boldo is reputed to be one of the best liver tonics and is also useful in treating bladder and kidney problems. It activates the secretion of saliva and stimulates liver activity and bile flow thus it is a successful treatment for gallbladder pain and gallstones. The plant is used in the treatment of digestive disorders, as a laxative, as a diuretic, for hepatic disturbances,  for  worms, gonorrhea, syphilis, gout, jaundice, rheumatism, dyspepsia, rheumatism, earache and head colds.           . 

Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum): The tops and leaves of this herb are used to treat minor viral and bacterial infections like colds and flu and has been used widely as a treatment for arthritis. It reduces fever and cleans out mucous from the lungs. Used as a pain reliever it eases joint pains and rheumatism.

        

Borage (Borago officinalis): The leaves are used to make a poultice for soothing inflammations. It makes a tea for lung and respiratory problems. It is a diuretic and is also used for treating inflamed skin and sores. Oil from the seeds is used to treat premenstrual complaints, rheumatism, eczema, boost immunity, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic skin conditions and inflammation.

                                                                         

Broom (Sarothamnus scoparius (Cytisus scoparius): Broom is normally used as a remedy for an irregular, fast heartbeat and to treat cardiac edema. It is also used to stimulate the production of urine, consequently resisting urine retention. It can be used to prevent blood loss after childbirth and for acute constipation.

 

Buchu (Agathosma betulina and A. crenulata): The leaves are used to treat cystitis, urethritis, problems of the prostate, gout, rheumatism, coughs and colds and digestive problems. It is used mixed with vinegar to treat bruises and sprains and as a powder to repel insects.

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Buckthorn (Rhamnus catharticus (R. frangula)): Buckthorn bark is used in the treatment of colic, constipation, dropsy, liver congestion, hemorrhoids and obesity as well as ulcerative colitis and acute appendicitis. It is good for inducing perspiration and for lowering fevers. Other uses include the treatment of gallstones, itching, lead poisoning, parasites, skin diseases and worms. In ointment form it is used for treating warts and other skin problems.           

Burdock (Arctium lappa): Western herbalists have for a long time used Burdock as a diuretic and a treatment for blood and urinary disorders. It is also used for colds, flu, measles and constipation. It is used to cleanse the blood of residues that accumulate from arthritis, gout and rheumatism, as well as reducing uric acid. Bacterial and fungal infections have been treated with it where it has been used as a dressing .It has also been used to reduce blood sugar.

Burr Marigold (Bidens tripartite (Bidens tripartita):  This has been used to treat any kind of hemorrhaging including uterine hemorrhage and when blood is present in the urine. It is also used in the treatment of peptic ulcer, diarrhea, disorders of the respiratory system, fevers and to retain water because of kidney problems.

Butcher's Broom (Ruscus aculeate): Butcher’s Broom is a common treatment for cramps in the legs and arthritis. It is a mild diuretic and can be used to reduce inflammation. An ointment is made from it for treating hemorrhoids. 

Butterbur (Petasites hybridus): Its main use is in the treatment of chest problems like bronchitis, asthma and whooping cough. It is a pain reliever and eases muscle spasms. It strengthens digestion especially when indigestion occurs from obstructed bile flow. This herb has been used to treat fevers and for inflammation of the urinary tract. The fresh leaves can be made into a poultice for treating wounds and skin eruptions.

 

 

 

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

 

 

 

Calamint (Calamintha officinalis): The whole herb is harvested around July when it is in its best condition and then dried. It has a sweet aromatic smell, is an expectorant and produces perspiration. A tea made from this is pleasant tasting and has been taken for weak stomachs and flatulent colic. It has been used to relieve convulsions and cramps, shortness of breath, pain in the stomach or bowels, jaundice and for killing intestinal worms.

 

Calamus (Acorus americanus): Calamus rhizome is a bitter tonic that is used to stimulate the digestive juices, and act against over acidity, heartburn and intestinal gas. It increases the appetite and is used for stomach and liver inflammation and rheumatism. It is also used for reducing blood pressure, clearing lung congestion and eliminating coughs.

Calendula (Calendula officinalis):
Calendula is a popular ingredient in ointments and creams where it is used to decrease the inflammation from insect stings, sprains, varicose veins and other swellings and also soothes sunburn, rashes, burns and other skin irritations. It kills bacteria and fungus therefore is a good treatment for athlete’s foot and ringworm. Systemic skin disorders such as eczema and acne have responded favorably to Calundela and it has also been used to treat inflammatory conditions of the digestive system such as peptic ulcers, gastritis and colitis. It also heals conditions associated with the liver and gallbladder. Menstrual bleeding and menstrual pain have been regulated and relieved by it. A douche made from it is useful in fighting yeast infections.

California Poppy (Eschscholzia californica):  California poppy is not a narcotic like its relative the opium poppy. It is used to regularize psychological functions particularly in children. It is a gentle antispasmodic, a sedative and an analgesic, which makes it ideal for treating children who have difficulty in sleeping, anxiety, nervous tension and bedwetting. It is also recommended for headaches, insomnia and in the treatment of gallbladder colic.

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Cancer Bush (Sutherlandia frutescens ): Cancer Bush is considered to be useful for a wide range of problems. It is used both internally and externally. Internally it has been used to treat fever, chicken pox, liver ailments, hemorrhoids, diarrhea, backaches, bladder, uterus and female complaints. Externally it is used as a treatment for washing wounds and for eye troubles. It is also in general use for colds, flu, diabetes, varicose veins, inflammation, liver problems and rheumatism.

 

 Cankerroot (Coptis groenlandica or C. greenlandica): Chewed raw or boiled, the roots and rhizomes of Cankerroot have been used as a treatment for blisters caused by fever, canker sores and other irritations of the mouth. It has also been used to treat indigestion and sore throats. The roots can also be used to make an eyewash. 

                          

Capers (Capparis spinosa): A laxative effect is derived from the unopened flower buds and if mixed with vinegar can be used to control stomach pain. The bark which is bitter is a diuretic and if taken just before meals it will boost the appetite. The bark is used to stop internal bleeding, to treat skin conditions, capillary weakness and easy bruising. It is also used in the cosmetic industry. An extract of the plant is used as an appetizer and a digestive aid, while it can be used to treat yeast and vaginal infections. A poultice made from it is a long time treatment for swellings and bruises.

Caper Spurge (Euphorbia lathyrus): Caper Spurge is an exceedingly strong purgative and it is not recommended for modern herbal medicine. 

Caraway (Carum carvi): Caraway water has been successfully used for colic and flatulence especially in babies. It is said to have properties that cause it to be used as an expectorant, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, for dyspepsia, diarrhea and hysteria. It improves the appetite and stimulates the secretion of bile.

 

Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum): Cardamom has been widely used in India for treating many ailments such as kidney stones, bronchitis, anorexia and asthma. It is well known as an aphrodisiac. It can be used to treat emphysema, involuntary urination and lung problems. An extract from it is said to be a tonic for the lungs, spleen and nerves. Its digestive properties make it a favorite after dinner drink. Warming and invigorating to the stomach it lifts the spirit, rids depression, frees spasms, increases the appetite, settles the stomach, stops vomiting, heals bruises and is an antidote.

Carline Thistle (Carlina acaulis): This is used internally for fluid retention, gallbladder, and prostare problems, stomach and liver disorders, bronchitis, edema, and skin complaints such as eczema and acne. A decoction is used externally to bathe fungal infections and wounds and as an antiseptic gargle. The root is antispasmodic, antibiotic, digestive, diuretic, emetic in large doses and purgative when taken in large amounts. It is also used as an aphrodisiac and a treatment for dropsy.

 Carob (Ceratonia siliqua): Carob pods due to their high sugar content are nutritious and have a laxative effect. The pulp however is anti-diarrheal and helps to cleanse the intestines and relieve irritation.                      

Carrot, Wild (Daucus carota): This is a vegetable which is considered to be a superb cleansing medicine. It stimulates the liver, aids urine flow and helps the kidneys to remove waste. The juice makes a nice tasting drink and a superb detoxifier, which is full of carotenes, which is later converted by the liver to vitamin A to generally help the vision. The leaves make a good diuretic. It has been used to treat cystitis and kidney stone formation and to reduce stones already formed. The seeds are diuretic also and are used to stimulate menstruation. Both the leaves and seeds are used to treat colic, flatulence, upset stomach and for settling digestion. It can also lower blood pressure.

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Cascara sagrada (Rhamnus purshiana): Cascara is known as a very good laxative and is found in many commercial laxatives. It has also been used to treat dysentery, heart strain, biliousness, chronic constipation, colitis, digestive problems, hemorrhoids, liver problems and jaundice. Externally it is used to wash sores, treat swellings and as a deterrent to thumb sucking and nail biting.

 

Cassia (Cinnamomum cassia): It is used medicinally for digestive complaints such as colic, diarrhea, flatulence and nausea, and rheumatism, kidney disorders and colds. The essential oils are volatile therefore preparations made from it are usually as a powder, pills or as a tincture.

       

Catmint (Nepata cataria): Catmint tea is used for headaches, stomach aches, colic and as a sedative for children.  It has also been used as a treatment for nightmare, scurvy, nervousness, tuberculosis, colic, diarrhea, flatulence, hiccup, whooping cough, measles, asthma, yellow fever, scarlet fever, chicken pox, smallpox, jaundice and to help in bringing on menstruation. Externally, poultices were used to ease hives and reduce swellings. It makes a good tincture for rubbing rheumatic and arthritic joints. Some people smoke the dried leaves to relieve respiratory conditions such as asthma. The fresh green leaves are used when preparing a tincture or infusion.

Celandine (Chelidonium majus): Greater Celandine is a mild sedative and an antispasmodic. It is used to treat bronchitis, whooping cough, asthma, jaundice, gallstones, gallbladder pain and liver complaints. Externally a salve prepared from it is used to clear eczema, scrofula, herpes and hemorrhoids. Extracts from Celandine have been used to treat tumors of the breast, lung and colon.

 

Celandine, Lesser (Ranunculus ficaria): This is mainly used for treating piles.

Celery Seed (Apium graveolens dulce): This is used to treat asthma, liver diseases bronchitis, fever, flatulence, gout, arthritis, obesity, anxiety, colds, flu, and diseases of the spleen. It is a diuretic, a tranquilizer and a sedative. It is also used to increase appetite and promote menstruation. Celery seed tea is reputed to induce sleep and restfulness and as an aphrodisiac.

Centaury (Erythraea centaurium (Centaurium erythraea)): Centaury, one of the more useful bitter herbs is used in cases of dyspepsia and other stomach conditions which cause sluggish digestion. Taken over a number of weeks it increases stomach secretion, increases the appetite and produces more bile. As a blood purifier it works on the kidneys and liver. The juice applied externally will help to promote healing of wounds and if applied to the eyes will improve the vision. A decoction used often on the skin will remove spots and freckles while if applied to the hair will kill lice and other parasites.  

Chamomile, German (Matricaria recutita): German Chamomile is indicated in digestive problems, particularly in children. The most common uses are for pain, gas, indigestion, acidity, gastritis, colic, bloating, peptic ulcer, and irritable bowel syndrome.  It is an antispasmodic and relaxes tense and aching muscles and eases menstrual cramp. Stomach ulcers can be prevented as well as healed by this herb. It has also been used to treat asthma and hay fever.  Externally it can be used for itchy skin, sores and eczema. It is also used to ease abdominal cramp in children as well as their teething problems.

Chamomile, Roman (Chamaemelum nobile):
Roman Chamomile is often used in place of German chamomile and vice versa. The infusion of Roman chamomile however is far more bitter tasting than German Chamomile. It is used for nausea, vomiting, indigestion, loss of appetite, colic, menstrual cramps, and other cramping pains. It helps normalize digestive functions and may be taken for headaches and migraine, even by children.

 

Chaparal (Larrea tridentata): Chaparal is used for treating tuberculosis, bowel complaints, stomach ulcers, colds and flu.  It is also useful in treating asthma and other inflammatory conditions of the lung. Because it improves liver function it can cause the good cholesterol (HDL) to increase and the bad cholesterol (LDL) to decrease. It is also used to treat ringworm, athlete’s foot and other skin fungi, dry skin, cracked hands and feet and brittleness in hair and nails.

Chaste Tree (Vitex agnus-castus):  It is used to treat hormonal imbalances such as those likely to occur during menopause, menstruation or premenstrual syndrome and can be helpful in dissolving cysts and fibroids. It can also help in treating acne.

 

Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium): A strong infusion of Chervil will ease mosquito and other insect bites, if applied to the affected parts often. The juice from the freshly harvested herb during flowering has been used for eczema, gout stones, abscess, dropsy and female abdominal complaints. Externally the leaves are used to make poultices for boils, bruises and other skin conditions. It can be boiled in wine to treat urinary disorders and as a diuretic.The infusion can be used to lower blood pressure.

Chickweed (Stellaria media): Chickweed is antiflammatory and used to treat both internal and external inflammations. It can be used as a poultice for arthritis, joint pains, cuts and skin abrasions. Used to relieve severe itchiness and nettle rash it can also be used for eczema and varicose veins. An infusion added to the bath water will help to relieve the pain of rheumatism and may even enhance tissue repair. Internally it can be used to treat chest conditions, to aid digestion, stop nose bleeds and heavy menstrual bleeding and for fevers. It can also be used as a tonic for children.   

Chicory (Cichorium intybus): Chicory has been considered to be a very highly rated medical plant for hundreds of years. It is a bitter tonic which is very good for liver ailments and digestive problems and a wide range of other ailments  Some of its other uses include the treatment of dyspepsia, cleansing of the urinary tract, gout, rheumatic conditions, gallstones, kidney stones, lowering cholesterol and blood sugar, dry coughs, abscesses and lung and breast tumors.

Chinese Cucumber (Trichosanthes kirilowii): Chinese Cucumber is used internally for bronchial infection with thick phlegm, dry coughs, diabetes, abscesses, chest pain, constipation, colds and flu.              .

Chives (Allium schoenoprasum): Chives has been used as an antiseptic, diuretic and a stimulant.The oil of Chives has been used in medicines that lower blood pressure as well as for colds, flu and congested lungs.

 

Chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum): Chrysanthemum is widely used in Chinese medicine. It is used for a range of liver and kidney ailments and the resultant side effects. Some of the more common uses are for red and painful dry eyes, spots in front of the eyes, blurred vision, headache and deafness. The white Chrysanthemum is preferred for Liver conditions while the yellow variety is valuable in treating high blood pressure. 

       

Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum): Coriander seeds are used in many preparations to improve taste especially in bitter medicines. They are also used to reduce gas, aid digestion, relieve colic, improve appetite and control dysentery and measles. The oil is an antiseptic and is used to treat urinary tract restrictions and inflammations while it is included in ointments for rheumatic joints and muscles.

Cinchona (Cinchona calisaya): Quinine which is made from Cinchona is primarily used to treat malaria fever and other feverish conditions. Cinchona is bitter and is used to stimulate the appetite, saliva and digestive secretions and improve weak digestive functions. It is sometimes used to relieve arthritis, cramps, dysentery and sciatica. It makes a useful gargle for sore and infected throats. For heart conditions it is used to reduce palpitations, reduce the heart rate and improve irregular heartbeat.

Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum): Cinnamon is widely used as a warming stimulant in Chinese medicine. It increases vitality, stimulates all the vital functions of the body, reduces congestion, stops diarrhea, improves digestion, is antirheumatic, relieves abdominal spasms and aids in blood circulation. It is used against vaginal yeast infections, urinary tract infections, fevers and to reduce blood pressure. The powder is used to dress cuts and scrapes.

                       

Cinquefoil (Potentilla reptans and P. canadensis): The outer bark of the root is used for treating diarrhea and internal hemorrhages. It is used to relieve sore mouths, sore throats, fever and coughs.

       

Clary Sage (Salvia sclaria):  An astringent made from Clary Sage is used as a gargle, as a douche and for dressing wounds. It is also used to relieve muscle spasms, to treat stomach problems such as gas and indigestion, to help in premenstrual problems and for hot flashes and other problems associated with menopause. A tea from the leaves can be used as an eye wash.

Cleavers (Galium aparine): A very good tonic for the lymphatic system is made from Cleavers. It is also used to treat swollen glands throughout the body, particularly tonsillitis and adenoid problems. It is a treatment for hepatitis, high blood pressure, excess fluid, inflammations, urinary infections and venereal disease. Externally, a poultice can be made from it to reduce inflammations, and treat cancerous growths and tumors. Sunburn and freckles can also benefit from a decocted solution.

 

Cloves (Syzigium aromaticum or Eugenia Caryophyllata):  This is used to treat hernia, diarrhea, indigestion, ringworm, and fungal infections like athlete’s foot. Oil made from Cloves is antiseptic, a stimulant and effective for stomach and digestive problems. It can be used to treat coli bacilli, streptococci, staphylococci and pneumococci. In dentistry it is used as an antiseptic and pain reliever and also in the preparation of fillings and cement. Patients suffering from acne, skin ulcers, and sores have had relief by using cloves and insects like mosquitoes and moth are repelled by it.

Cocoa (Theobroma cacao): The basic use of cocoa is as a food. It has however been used as a stimulant for the nervous system as well as a tonic for the heart and kidneys. Cocoa butter is used as a lip salve, for treating burns, for sore nipples of nursing mothers, for dressing wounds, to remove spots on the skin, to rub on balding heads and to treat bacteria that cause boils and septicemia. Hot Cocoa is helpful to asthma sufferers and a nourishing drink for invalids and persons recovering from acute illness. It may cause headaches in some people especially those suffering from migraine. It is a diuretic and can be used for patients suffering from high blood pressure. There are cases where it has been used to treat fever, coughs and complaints related to pregnancy and childbirth.                                                   

Cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium): This is used to treat rheumatism, arthritis, diarrhea, chronic lumbago, leprosy, severe itching of the skin and to open the nasal passages and sinuses. It also has analgesic, diuretic and antispasmodic reactions. The stem and leaves are used to treat German measles. A tincture of the crushed seeds is a good first aid dressing especially for skin abrasions.

Codonopsis (Codonopsis pilosula and Codonopsis tangshen): Codonopsis is a tonic that increases energy, balances the metabolism, and tones up the lungs and spleen. In Chinese herbal medicine it is sometimes used in place of ginseng to which it is similar but somewhat milder. It is used to treat respiratory problems such as shortness of breath and asthma. It clears excessive mucus from the lungs and is also used in cases of digestive problems like loss of appetite, vomiting and diarrhea and for general tiredness. It increases milk production in nursing mothers, lowers blood pressure and has the ability to maintain alertness.

Cola (Cola acuminata): Kola nut has been used as an antidepressant because of its ability to stimulate the central nervous system and the whole body. It increases muscular strength and alertness and is used in cases of migraine and headaches. It is a diuretic and can be used in cases of dysentery or diarrhea. Because of its stimulating effect it can be put to good use in the treatment of anorexia and cases of depression.                        . 

Coleus (Coleus forskohlii): Coleus lowers blood pressure, stimulates digestive juices, reduces pressure in the eye, and relieves bronchial asthma. A powerful medicine for heart conditions it is used to treat congestive heart failure, poor coronary blood flow, reduces preload and after load of the heart and increases circulation of blood to the brain. 

                               

Coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara): Coltsfoot leaves are used for treating problems associated with the lungs such as asthma, bronchitis, severe coughing and laryngitis. Externally it is made into a poultice or cream for sores and ulcers.

Comfrey (Symphytum officinale): Comfrey leaves and root are popularly used in preparations for skin problems such as wounds,hemorrhoids, varicose veins, rashes and inflammation.It also stops bleeding and when taken internally it helps to heal peptic and duodenal ulcers and colitis.Respiratory diseases, especially where this is associated with the coughing of blood responds well to Comfrey. It is also good for treating bleeding stomach or bowels. It soothes the throat, reduces fever, relieves coughing and is a good treatment for asthma, chronic lung diseases and other wasting diseases. It can be taken internally and externally simultaneously with very good results.

Common Mallow (Malva sylvestris):  Mallow is used in the treatment of painful swellings, stomach ulcers, gastritis, laryngitis, catarrh, bronchitis and digestive problems. It is a diuretic, a laxative and good for treating digestive problems. Externally it is made into a lotion for treating acne and similar skin conditions. It helps in coughs and other chest ailments and the root is given to children with teething problems.

Condurango (Marsdenia condurango): This bitter herb is used to treat digestive and stomach problems particularly indigestion which is caused by anxiety or nervous tension. It can be taken for liver disorders, anorexia and to induce menstruation. Externally the white latex which is caustic is used to treat warts.

Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus): Cornflower is used as an eye wash. The petals are used to fight infection and for diseases of the urinary tract. It is said to be a tonic for improving digestion and supporting liver functions. The seeds can provide a mild laxative for children. The leaves can also be used to treat rheumatic complaints..

Costmary (Chrysanthemum balsamita (previous C. majus and Tanacetum balsamita): This herb is hardly used today but was used long ago to treat dysentery and other digestive complaints. It was also used for headaches, pain from gout, wounds, burns, skin infections from parasites, colds, upset stomach, stomach cramps and to induce menstruation and ease childbirth.

Costus (Saussurea lappa (S. costus): This is used as a stimulant and tonic. It has also been used to assist in treating problems of the respiratory system such as asthma, coughs and bronchitis. It has also been reported as a treatment for cholera.                                            

Couchgrass (Agropyron repens (Elymus repens): Couch grass is used for urinary infections, such as cystitis, nephritis and urethritis. It is also used for jaundice, gallstones, gout and rheumatic complaints. It improves excretion from the bowels and kidney, lowers cholesterol levels in the blood and protects the urinary tubules against infection. When used with other herbs it helps to treat kidney stones sometimes dissolving them. It has also been used to treat enlarged prostates. Juice from the roots is a treatment for jaundice and other liver complaints. It has also been reported to have antibiotic action on a number of bacteria and molds.                      

Country Mallow (Sida cordifolia): The leaves, roots, stems and seeds are each used and prepared by themselves, to achieve best results for different complaints. This herb rejuvenates the circulatory, urinary, nervous and reproductive systems. It is helpful in nervous system disorders such as paralysis, stiff neck, insanity, headache, sciatica, tinnitus, neuralgia and inflammation of the nerves. It is used to treat bronchial asthma, colds, flu, chills, headache, nasal congestion, aching bones and joints, cough with wheezing and edema. It is a diuretic which is effective in urinary problems such as cystitis, it stimulates the nervous system and is antiasthmatic. The root is used to treat fever and urinary urgency. The seeds are used for urinary infections. It is useful in bleeding disorders such as chronic dysentery and bleeding hemorrhoids. As a medicated oil it can be used for sore muscles, sore joints, rheumatism and arthritis.

Cow Parsnip (Heracleum maximum (H lanatum): The roots should be dried before use to reduce bitterness and bad taste. When powdered the dry roots have been used to treat fever and to relieve the discomfort of loose teeth. It is also used in cases of acid indigestion, asthma, colic, gas, diarrhea, nausea, heartburn, and problems of the nervous system. It can also be made into a poultice for treating sore muscles and joints. When mixed with oil or fat it is used for rubbing areas affected by rheumatism.                                                                                           .

Cowslip (Primula veris (syn Primula officinalis): Cowslip is a valuable plant in the treatment of chronic bronchitis and for the clearance of phlegm. The root is thought to be diuretic and is used to slow blood clotting and to treat rheumatism. The flowers are used as a sedative especially for children and to treat asthma and other allergic problems, migrane headaches, insomnia and kidney and bladder conditions. They are also used to make an ointment for dry skin and sunburn. A poultice from the leaves is used for wounds..

Cramp Bark (Viburnum opulus): Crampbark is generally used to relieve muscle tension. It is also used to treat breathing difficulty from asthma or other allergic conditions, menstrual cramps, back pain, constipation, colic, irritable bowel syndrome and nervous tension. It is also used to treat high blood pressure and as a relief in arthritis where the muscles have severely contracted. Excessive blood loss during menstruation as well as bleeding during menopause can be effectively treated with Cramp Bark. It is also used for pains in the thighs, back or uterus during menstruation or pregnancy.

Cuban Oregano (Plectranthus amboinicus): It is used to treat asthma, bronchitis, coughs and to reduce inflammation.

 

Cubeb (Piper cubeba): Cubeb is a diuretic, a stimulant, an antiseptic and a treatment for colic and flatulence. It is also used for asthma and pulmonary infections like bronchitis. The oil is used in lozenges, urinary ailments and as a treatment for gonorrhea. Cubeb is also used to treat indigestion, bronchitis, catarrh, lung problems and coughs. It is claimed that cigarettes made from it, when smoked, relieve bronchial problems such as hay fever and asthma.

Culantro (Eryngium foetidum (E. antihystericum): In some areas it is considered to be a cure for almost anything. The main uses however are for treating high blood pressure, epilepsy, flu, fevers and chills. As a tea it is used for diarrhea, vomiting, constipation and diabetes.

 

Cumin (Cuminum cyminum): Cumin seed is a very useful treatment for diarrhea, indigestion, colds, fever and headaches. It is said to increase lactation and reduce nausea during pregnancy. Externally it is used as a poultice to relieve swelling of the breast or testacles. It is also used by Veterinarians.

 

 Curry Leaf (Murraya koenigii):  The leaves and the stem are used as a tonic, a stimulant, an anti-emetic and carminative. The bark and roots are made into a paste for treating poisonous bites and bruises. A concoction made from the leaves is used for scalp and hair treatment. Burns and wounds are healed when a poultice from the leaves is applied.

 

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

Daisy (Bellis perennis (English): Externally the flowers are used to make a lotion for varicose veins, skin diseases, wounds, bruises, sore and watery eyes. Internally it is used to treat coughs, cold and chest problems, mucous congestion, stomach and intestinal problems, catarrh, colic and bladder, liver and kidney problems. It is also used to help in the healing of inflamed swellings and burns. It is also considered as a gentle laxative.

                                          

Damiana (Turnera diffusa): Damiana is an aphrodisiac. It is also used to treat the kidneys, helps the digestion, and relieves constipation, coughs and lung problems. For men, it is helpful in treating premature ejaculation and impotence. It is also used to treat urinary infections such as cystitis and urethritis. It is a tonic for the nervous system helping to ease debility, depression and lethargy.

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale): Dandelion is used to stimulate the appetite, promote digestion, increase bile production, treat rheumatism, heart disease and gout. It purifies the blood and helps the liver and kidney to increase elimination thus being useful in the treatment of skin problems such as eczema. Many uses have been found for it like treating pneumonia, colds, bronchitis, boils, ulcers, hepatitis, internal injuries, dental problems, itching, gallbladder problems, cirrhosis and jaundice. It is a diuretic, is used to reduce weight and used in the treatment of malaria, sore throats, gonorrhea and vaginal yeast infections. It is a strong stimulant and is regarded by some as an aphrodisiac.             

Devil’s Claw (Harpagophytum procumbens): It has been widely used in the treatment of gout, obesity, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, dyspepsia and diseases of the kidney, bladder and liver. Other complaints like arteriosclerosis, gastrointestinal problems, lumbago, allergies, menstrual conditions, headache, neuralgia, heartburn and nicotine poisoning have improved after being treated with Devil’s Claw. Diabetes, respiratory ailments and hardening of the arteries caused by aging have also been treated with it.

Devil’s Club (Oplopanax horridum): Devil's Club is used in the treatment of diabetes to stabilize blood sugar. It is also used to soften hardened bronchial mucus and acts as a respiratory stimulant and expectorant. Rheumatoid arthritis can also be treated with it.

 

Dill (Anethum graveolens):  Dill seeds are used to increase appetite, improve digestion, relieve flatulence and sweeten the breath. Derivatives of the seeds have been used to treat indigestion, fevers, uterine pain, ulcers and eye and kidney problems. Chewing the seeds will remove bad breath and drinking the tea will enhance the production of breast milk in nursing mothers.

 

Dittany of Crete (Origanum dictamnus): This plant has been used internally for stomach ailments, gastric problems, to soothe pain, rheumatism and to make childbirth easier. Externally a salve containing it is used to treat sciatica and similar aches.

 

Dodder (Cuscuta epithymum): Dodder is a laxative and is primarily used to treat kidney, liver and bladder complaints.

 

Dodder, Big Fruit (Cuscuta megalocarpa): A bath made from this plant was used to treat fevers and tuberculosis. It is a laxative that enhances the production of bile and is also considered to be a contraceptive. A poultice of the plant when applied to the affected area will relieve the effects of insect stings.

 

Dodder, Japanese (Cuscuta japonica): This herb is used in the treatment of constipation, backache, diarrhea, impotence, urinary frequency, vaginal discharge, prostate conditions and neurological weakness. It builds the blood, increases sperm count and strengthens sinews and bones.

 

Dong Quai (Angelica sinensis): This herb is often used to relieve menstrual cramps, regulate the menstrual cycle, increase blood circulation particularly to the hands and feet, improve blood condition, combat anemia and strengthen digestion. Externally it is used to treat abscesses and boils. It has an antibiotic effect and aids liver functions. An extract from it is used to treat the pain from sciatica.

 

Dragon's Blood (Daemonorops draco syn Calamus draco): Internally it is used as a treatment for dysentery, chest pains, menstrual irregularities, traumatic injuries and bleeding after childbirth. Externally it is used to stop bleeding and promote healing.

 Dyers Greenwood (Genista tinctoria): The flowering stems and seeds have strong diuretic qualities, and laxative, emetic, cathartic and cardioactive properties. This has been used to treat kidney and urinary disorders, gout, to raise blood pressure and to relieve pain brought on by arthritis or rheumatism. The seed is used to make a plaster for broken limbs.

 

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

Elder (Sambucus nigra): Different parts of the plant are used for different purposes. The flowers are diuretic, an expectorant, a circulatory stimulant, anti-inflammatory and are used to treat fevers, severe lung and bronchial problems and skin eruptions like measles, chronic congestion, allergies, ear infection and to increase the resistance to infection of the nose and throat. The berries are also diuretic and a laxative and are used to treat coughs, colic, flu, asthma, sore throat and rheumatism. The bark is an emetic, diuretic and a laxative but should only be used after being allowed to age for over one year to get rid of some toxic properties. 
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Elecampane (Inula helenium): This is used to treat chronic lung conditions such as asthma and bronchitis, whooping cough, pneumonia, dyspepsia, malignant fevers and diseases of the breast. Externally it has found its way into ointments and surgical dressings and can also be made into a wash for facial neuralgia and sciatica.  

Epazote (Chenopodium ambrosioides): Epazote has been used for a long time to treat intestinal parasites with special emphasis on hookworms and round worms. It is also used in cases of gastrointestinal problems, colic, stomach pains, chronic cough, asthma and flatulence. Externally it is used as a wash for hemorrhoids, and as a treatment for snake bites and other poisonings.   .

Ephedra (Ephedra sinica and E. vulgaris): Ephedra is a bronchodilator and a heart stimulant. It increases blood pressure and the metabolic rate while enhancing the production of perspiration and urine. It reduces the secretion of saliva and stomach acids. Generally it is used to treat asthma, chills, fever, hay fever, and rheumatism and kidney deficiency. It is not recommended for use by pregnant women.

Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis): This is considered to be an anticoagulant that reduces high blood pressure, prevent heart attacks and protect against coronary artery disease. It has also been helpful in rheumatoid arthritis, eczema, liver problems and dry and brittle nails.

Eyebright (Euphrasia officinalis): Eyebright contains astringent and antibiotic properties which make it useful for treating the eyes. It relieves conjunctivitis and blepharitis and other eye inflammation. Because of its ability to counter mucus it is used quite often for infectious and allergic conditions affecting the eyes, middle ear, sinuses and the nasal passages. It can be used internally for catarrh, sinusitis and other congestive conditions.

 

 

 

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

False Indigo (Baptisia tinctoria): The root is used to improve the immune system and to fight against infection. It is considered to be effective against upper respiratory infections like tonsillitis, chest infections, gastrointestinal tract problems, sore nipples and skin infections. Sometime ago it was used to treat typhoid and scarlet fevers. It is used in ointments, poultices and washes for skin ulceration, boils and infections. As a mouthwash it relieves canker sores, sore throat and gum infections. It is used in douches for vaginitis and cervical ulcers. It is recommended in the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as arthritis

 

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare): Fennel is widely used in the treatment of the digestive system such as colic, flatulence and indigestion. It is also used to clean the blood, liver, spleen and gallbladder. It is also effective in colds, shortness of breath and wheezing. An infusion of the seeds is used as a gargle for gum problems, loose teeth, laryngitis or sore throats       

Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum):  Fenugreek is used to aid digestion and treat inflammations. The seeds are soothing to the skin and are also used in drugs and food as an emulsifier. An infusion from the seeds is used in the treatment of diarrhea, flatulence, coughing and to stimulate milk flow in nursing mothers. A poultice from the crushed seed and hot milk is used for ulcers, sciatica, inflammation, swollen glands and bruises. It is also used to treat fevers and is considered by some to be an aphrodisiac.

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Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium also Chrysanthemum parthenium): This is widely used in the treatment of migraine headaches and can be helpful in rheumatic and arthritic pains. It has also been used to induce menstruation, to aid the expulsion of the placenta in difficult births and for treating colic, stomach ache and kidney pains.                                  

Figwort   (Scrophularia nodosa): Figwort is used to purify and cleanse the body,  to treat skin diseases such as acne, eczema and psoriasis and as a fomentation for sprains, swellings, inflammations, wounds, sores and gangrene. It is also used for congenital illnesses of the lymphatic system and the skin and has a stimulating and strengthening effect on the kidneys and bladder. It is a diuretic and is used in the treatment of diabetes, fevers, swelling and pain of the throat and an aid to digestion.                                                                   .

Fo-Ti (Polygonum multiflorum): Fo-Ti is widely used as a tonic for the liver and kidney. It helps to cleanse the blood and increases the fertility in both men and women. It is also prescribed for chronic malaria, insomnia, upset stomach and diabetes. High blood pressure and the hardening of the veins and arteries as well as high blood cholesterol all improve with the taking of Fo-Ti. It is also an aid in the treatment of tuberculosis.

                                                       

Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea): Foxglove yields digitoxin, which is used to increase the force of the heart’s contractions resulting in reduced blood pressure in the veins and the pulse is slowed and stabilized. It is used to increase the pressure of systolic contractions in congestive heart failure, lowers venous pressure in hypertensive heart ailments and raises blood pressure in weak heart. It is a diuretic and reduces swelling.

 

Frankincense (Boswellia serrata): It is an anti-inflammatory and antiseptic which is used in the treatment of urinary and genital conditions, digestive tract ulcers and chronic diarrhea. It is also used to increase menstruation and for treating breast cysts. When inhaled it helps asthma sufferers by relieving shortness of breath and increasing the volume of the breath. It is also used for soothing the stomach, aiding digestion, dyspepsia, belching, menstrual pain and rheumatism. Externally it is used as a wash for sores and bruises. 

                                            

Fringe Tree (Chionanthus virginicus): The bark is used to treat liver problems especially jaundice. It is used for treating inflammation of the gallbladder and gallstones and as a laxative. The functions of the pancreas and spleen are enhanced by it and the liver and whole body is aided. It may significantly reduce the level of sugar in the urine and will stimulate the appetite and digestive system. Externally the bark is crushed and made into a poultice for treating sores and wounds.

 

Fumitory (Fumaria officinalis): The herb is chiefly used to treat skin problems such as eczema and dermatitis. It stimulates the gallbladder and liver and is a diuretic as well as a laxative. It is used for bilary colic, digestive problems, migraine and to help cure depression. Externally it may be used to treat conjunctivitis.

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

Galangal (Languas officinarum): Galangal is an aromatic stimulant, carminative, antispasmodic and antibacterial. It is used to treat rheumatism, flatulence, catarrh, nausea, dyspepsia and enteritis. It is considered to be an aphrodisiac. This rhizome can be grated and used externally as a poultice for boils to bring them to a head. It is also used to treat hiccups, stomach pains, vomiting, seasickness, diarrhea, dyspepsia, fever and rheumatoid arthritis. It may also be used externally to ease painful canker sores and sore gums as well as treating halitosis.

                                                    

Galbanum (Ferula galbaniflua): Galbanum is a stimulant, an anti-spasmodic and used as an expectorant in chronic bronchitis and is also used to relieve congested air passages. It is also used in some cases of hysteria and can be used externally as a plaster for inflammatory swellings.

 

                        

Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata): This is taken internally for eczema, bronchitis and asthma. It warms the stomach and aids digestion. Externally the leaves were used as a dressing for ulcers and open sores also for gout, neuralgia and rheumatism. The seeds have been used to induce sneezing and when boiled in wine is good for colicky wind.                              

Gas Plant (Dictamnus albus): This plant is hardly used today. It strongly stimulates the muscles of the uterus inducing menstruation and sometimes leads to abortion. It is antispasmodic and provides a tonic for the stomach. It is also used for skin diseases like eczema and scabies, German measles, jaundice and arthritic pain.

Gentian (Gentiana lutea): Gentian is a very bitter digestive tonic and is sometimes referred to as “bitter root”.  When taken about half hour before meals it increases the appetite, stimulates the activity of the pancreas and increases the supply of blood to the digestive tract. It decreases intestinal inflammation, kills intestinal parasites and helps to digest fats and protein. Liver and spleen problems can be treated with Gentian and it is also effective in treating heartburn and indigestion as well as bringing on menstruation. It has been used to treat fevers, sore throat, venereal diseases, headaches, arthritis, jaundice and other liver problems.

 

Germander (Teucrium chamaedrys ): The plant is an ingredient in some tonic wines and has been taken to assist in weight loss. It is normally used to treat gout, uterine obstructions, fever, rheumatism, congestion and stomach problems. Externally it has been used as a mouthwash for sore gums and as a lotion to help in the healing of wounds.

                                                               

Ginger (Zingiber officinale): The root made into a tea is effective in indigestion, colic, diarrhea and alcoholic gastritis. Dried Ginger is useful in treating car sickness, seasickness and morning sickness in pregnant women. Because of its anti-inflammatory properties it is a good treatment for most kinds of arthritis. Ginger added to honey and lime juice is a very effective remedy for coughs, colds, fevers and flu. It is said to reduce serum cholesterol levels and reduces the possibility of blood clots. It is also helpful in the destruction of intestinal parasites.

           
Ginseng (Panax ginseng): Ginseng for a long time was considered to be an all purpose treatment. It is usually taken in conjunction with other drugs. It is said to increase mental and physical efficiency and helps to resist stress and disease. It increases the carbohydrate tolerance in diabetics. It reduces bad cholesterol and increases the good cholesterol. Ginseng protects the liver from the harmful effects of alcohol drugs and other toxic substances. It is an appetite stimulant and helps to prevent malnutrition. In the elderly it reduces fatigue and improves performance. It has been used to treat diabetes and helps to reduce fatigue and increase sexual desire.

 Ginseng, Tienchi (Panax pseudo-ginseng (P. notoginseng): The roots are used internally to treat coronary heart disease and angina, nose bleed,  hemorrhage from the lungs, digestive tract, uterus or injuries. The flowers are used to treat dizziness and vertigo. It is a blood and energy tonic and it strengthens the heart and improves the performance of athletes.

Goat’s Rue (Galega officinalis): Goat’s Rue is mainly used as an antidiabetic herb, being able to reduce blood sugar levels. It is also used to treat hyperglycemia, edema and fluid retention. It should not be used as a replacement for prescribed treatment. As a diuretic it encourages sweating and reduces fevers. It is useful in digestive problems, especially chronic constipation, for intestinal worms and is effective in improving breast milk production.

 

Golden Seal (Hydrastis canadensis): It is used to treat infections, inflammation and congestion of the mucous lining of the lungs, throat, sinuses and digestive tract. It keeps the mucous membranes dry thus reducing excessive flow. It aids digestion, counteracts inflammation, treats liver diseases, regulates menstruation, cleanses the blood and counters infection. Excessive bleeding is countered by it as it contracts the blood vessels. It is also used to treat flu, fever, infections of all kind, vaginal yeast, gastro-enteritis, indigestion, heartburn, gas, dysentry and hemorrhoids. A salve made from Golden Seal is used to treat ringworm, herpes, canker sores, hemorrhoids and inflamed gums. It also makes an effective douche for thrush and trichomonas. It can be made into a gargle for sore throat and an eye wash for conjunctivitis. A bitter digestive, it stimulates appetite and bile production and also helps in the treatment of severe diarrhea caused by different diseases, including cholera.                                                                                                                

Goldenrod (Solidago spp (virgaurea): Goldenrod is antioxidant, diuretic and astringent and consequently is a valuable remedy for urinary tract disorders like nephritis and cystitis. It is also said to help flush out kidney and bladder stones. Other uses include skin diseases, influenza, flatulent dyspepsia, chronic excess mucus, whooping cough and upper respiratory catarrh. Externally it is used for insect bites, wounds, ulcers, sore throat and as a gargle for laryngitis and pharyngitis.

Good King Henry (Chenopodium bonus-henricus): The plant which is a source of iron and vitamin C is a diuretic and laxative and is recommended for indigestion. It makes a poultice that cleanses and heals skin sores also an ointment for painful joints.

                                                

Gotu Kola (Centella asiatica): Gotu kola has been used to revitalize the nerves and brain cells. It is also used to treat leprosy, skin ulcers and other skin problems. It enhances the regeneration of skin cells and underlying connective tissue. It speeds up the healing of burns and skin grafts and minimizes scarring.  Other uses include fevers, asthma, bronchitis, dysentery and abdominal disorders. Because of its anti-inflammatory properties it is used for rheumatism, rheumatoid arthritis and poor circulation through the veins. Gotu Kola is a glandular tonic that cleanses and feeds the immune system and purifies the blood by neutralizing blood acids.

      

Grains of Paradise (Aframomum melegueta):  This is used to treat nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain, indigestion, diarrhea, involuntary urination, loss of appetite, flatulence and morning sickness, pain and discomfort during pregnancy. It also has stimulating and diuretic effects. 

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Grindelia (Grindelia robusta, G. squarossa):  Used as a tea for bronchitis and whenever an expectorant is indicated. It is a good antispasmodic for dry hacking coughs. The tincture is used for bladder and urethra infections. A poultice of the flowers is used to treat poison oak inflammations and as a lotion for dermatitis and other skin infections.

 

Ground Elder (Aegopodium podagraria): This is a diuretic and sedative and may be used for treating aches in the joints, gout and sciatica pain. Externally it is used as a fomentation for inflamed parts. The roots and leaves when boiled together and applied to the hip provide relief from the pain of sciatica.

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Ground Ivy (Glechoma hederacea (Nepeta hederacea): Ground Ivy has been used for a long time as a cure for headache. It was also used to treat toothache, earache, fever, gastritis, acid indigestion, diarrhea, scurvy and kidney disorders. Other complaints such as bladder and kidney problems, rheumatism and gout benefited from its treatment. As a tonic, diuretic and decongestant it is used in the treatment of problems affecting the mucous membranes of the ear, nose, throat and digestive system. An infusion can be used as a lotion or on poultices to cleanse sores and ulcers or heated and inhaled to relieve stuffy noses or head colds.

Guarana (Paullinia cupana): Guarana is taken for headaches and migraine, for mild depression and to boost energy. It should only be used as a short time remedy as prolonged use may lead to nutritional problems. It can also be used for chronic diarrhea.

                                                       

Gumweed (Grindelia camporum): Grindelia is used for asthma, bronchitis, whooping cough and upper respiratory catarrh. When used for asthmatic or bronchial conditions where these are accompanied by a rapid heart rate and nervous response, its relaxing effects on the heart is invaluable. It is also used to treat arrhythmia, arthritis, blisters, burns, colds coughs, cystitis, dyspepsia, eczema emphysema, fevers, gonorrhea, hay fever, hepatitis, hypertension, skin ulcers, pneumonia, rheumatism, smallpox, syphilis and tuberculosis. 

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

Hawthorn (Crataegus laevigata): Hawthorn normalizes the heart and circulation lowering or raising blood pressure as is necessary. It is a diuretic which is used for treating kidney and bladder stones, angina and coronary artery disease. Heart problems caused by hepatitis or other liver disease respond favorably to Hawthorn. In combination with Ginko it is said to enhance poor memory by increasing the amount of blood sent to the brain which takes more oxygen to the brain. The berries strengthen the appetite and digestion and are used to treat diarrhea, abdominal distention, sore throats and skin diseases. 

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Heather (Erica/Calluna vulgaris (E tetralix, E cinerea): It is used in baths for easing joint and muscle pain, and taken internally for urinary infections and to improve sleep. Nervousness and rheumatic pains were relieved by it. It makes a useful urinary antiseptic when taken internally for cystitis, urethritis and prostatitis. It is a mild diuretic and is a good cleansing remedy for gout, arthritis and skin problems like acne. The tips make a good poultice for chiliblains.                 .

Hedge Nettle (Stachys palustris):
 It is a sweating herb used in the early stages of colds, fevers and flu. Internally it is used for gout, cramps, vertigo, hemorrhage, diarrhea and dysentery. When applied externally to wounds it will stop bleeding and help to heal the wound. It may be used as an ointment or as a compress.                                       

Helonias Root (Chamaelirium luteurm (Helonias dioica): This herb is primarily used for female complaints but has some specific uses for males. It is a good tonic for strengthening the reproductive system and is used for the lack of and painful menstruation, and other menstrual irregularities as well as preventing miscarriages. It is useful in impotence and makes a tonic for genito-urinary weakness and liver and kidney diseases.

                                 

Hemp Agrimony (Eupatorium cannabinum): Hemp Agrimony has been used chiefly as a detoxifying herb for fever, colds, flu and other acute viral conditions. It also triggers the expulsion of waste products by the kidneys.  The root is a laxative, and the whole plant is said to make a good tonic. It has been found to help in maintaining a resistance to acute viral and other infections.

Henbane (Hyoscyamus niger): The leaves, flowering tops and branches of this plant are all combined to make preparations for treating asthma, bronchitis, whooping cough and motion sickness. It is added to laxatives to prevent griping and to anti-asthma and herbal cigarettes. Its sedative and antispasmodic properties make it a valuable treatment in the early stages of Parkinson disease. As an oil, it can be applied externally for painful conditions such as neuralgia, sciatica, rheumatism and dental pain. Henbane reduces mucus secretions, as well as saliva and other digestive juices.

Henna (Lawsonia inermis):  In powdered form, the leaves have been used both internally and externally to treat various skin diseases, including leprosy, fungal infections, acne and boils.  An infusion or decoction of the leaves is used to treat diarrhea and dysentery.        

Hens and Chicks (Sempervivum tectorum) or Houseleek: Internally it is used for shingles, skin complaints, and hemorrhoids.  The juice from the leaves have astringent and cooling properties, and is applied as an ointment to relieve the pain of burns, scalds, inflammations, shingles, ulcers, ringworm, gout, headache, sunburn, inflamed or itching skin, and bee stings.  It is also used in the treatment of corns and warts on the hands and feet. Chewing the leaves relieves toothache and sniffing the juice will stop nosebleed.

Herb Robert (Geranium robertianum):  In the past Herb Robert was used mostly in veterinary medicine, especially for the treatment of blood in the urine and infectious diseases. It is considered to be effective in the treatment of stomach ulcers and inflammation of the uterus. It is mostly used as an astringent and wound healer. 

Hibiscus (Hibiscus sabdariffa, rosa-sinensis):  The plant is considered to be a diuretic and antibacterial. Extracts of the flowers are said to lower the blood pressure and relax the muscles of the uterus. It is used for problems of the kidneys and reproductive system as well as menstrual problems, especially excessive bleeding. It helps to purify the blood, is good for the heart, improves skin complexion and promotes hair growth.

Holy Basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum (O. sanctum)):  A tea made from the leaves is effective in treating bronchitis, coughs, cold, mild indigestion, loss of appetite and restlessness. It is a stimulant, anti-inflammatory, a blood purifier and useful in skin diseases. The roots are used to treat malaria fever. Externally it is used on chronic ulcers, inflammation, skin disorders, pain in the abdomen, cough and respiratory disorders. It may even be used as a mosquito repellant

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Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica & L. caprifolium): The Honeysuckle flowers are widely used to treat sore throat, colds, flu, tonsillitis, bronchitis and pneumonia. The extracts are very active against many microorganisms that cause sore throat and other respiratory problems. It is active against salmonella typhi, staphylococcus aureus and streptococcus pneumonia. It is also used to inhibit tuberculosis. The leaves are used to make a gargle and mouthwash for sore throat and canker sores.

                                      

Hops (Humulus lupulus): Hops is a mild sedative, a diuretic and a digestive that is used to treat ulcers, nervous indigestion, Chron’s disease, insomnia and irritable bowel syndrome. Its antibacterial properties fight digestive tract infections. It can also help to regulate the menstrual cycle. Made into a poultice it can ease the pain of toothache or earache. Externally it is used in the treatment of leg ulcers, herpes, skin infections and eczema.

                                 

Horehound (Marrubium vulgare): Horehound’s bitterness is an appetite stimulant and promotes the production of bile. It is primarily used to fight lung disorders, especially bronchitis and coughs. The essential oils dilate the arteries and help to ease lung congestion. It normalizes the heartbeat and reduces fevers.

Horse Chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum): Horse chestnut is astringent, an anti-inflammatory, and reduces fluid retention. It is used for leg ulcers, varicose veins, and hemorrhoids, inflammation of the veins, phlebitis, and frostbite. The seeds have been used in the treatment of rheumatism, neuralgia, for rectal complaints and hemorrhoids.

                                   

Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana): Horseradish is a stimulant for the circulatory system. Taken regularly it will build up resistance to coughs and colds. It reduces catarrhal and bronchial complaints, reduces blood pressure and eases sinus pain. As a poultice it is used for rheumatism, chest complaints and circulation problems.

                            

Horsetail (Equisetum spp. (arvense and hyemale)): Horsetail is a strong diuretic for urinary tract and prostate disorders, bed wetting and skin problems. It is also used to treat dropsy, gonorrhoea, irritable bladder, prostatis and enuresis in children. It is also used for eye inflammations such as conjunctivitis and corneal disorders.

                            
Hound's Tongue (Cynoglossum officinale):
An infusion from shaved root or crushed leaves is used to bathe cuts, bruises, burns and eczema and to treat coughs and bronchitis.  The leaves produce a potent poultice for external relief of scrofulous tumors, burns, goiter and inflammations.  Use is similar to comfrey.  It makes a good treatment for piles and hemorrhoids drink a cup of the herb or root every day.  It has been used in catarrhs, hemoptysis, diarrhea, and dysentery. Externally, it has been found highly beneficial in removing the pain and soreness attending irritated, bruised, or chafed parts especially in excoriation of the feet from much traveling. The tincture, or the application of bruised fresh leaves will remove the swelling and ecchymosis consequent upon severe blows or bruises.

 

Hyacinth Bean (Lablab purpureus (Dolichos lablab)): Hyacinth Bean makes a good tonic for the spleen and stomach. The seeds are used to stimulate gastric activities, for vomiting and diarrhea  in acute gastroenteritis , rheumatic arthritis, sunstroke, colic and cholera . The flowers are used to treat dysentery, inflammation of the uterus and in cold disorders.

 

Hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens): This is used to treat stone formation in the bladder and kidneys as well as fluid retention. It is also used for cystitis, urethritis, prostatitis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout edema, chronic penile discharge in men and mucosal urinary irritation in the aged.

                              
Hyssop (Hyssop officinalis): The leaves and flowering tops are used to provide a tonic for the stomach. In lung conditions like bronchitis, when there is a lot of mucus, it is used as an expectorant. It is used to reduce congestion in asthma, flu and fever and is effective against gas, bloating and colic. A tea made from the fresh green tops is used for rheumatism.

 

 

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

 

Iceland Moss:   This is used to treat gastritis, vomiting, dyspepsia, bronchitis and respiratory catarrh. Generally it soothes the mucous membranes and is valuable in treating chronic digestive problems like irritable bowel syndrome. It is also used to expel intestinal parasites.

                                                                 

Inmortal (Asclepias asperula): Inmortal is used to treat asthma, pleurisy, bronchitis and other lung infections. It makes a mild and reliable cardiac tonic especially for congestive heart problems. It is an effective stimulant for scanty or painful menstrual periods. Nursing mothers will be helped in their milk production by drinking a tea made from it and a small amount of the powdered root when inhaled will cause vigorous sneezing but without irritation. Sinus sufferers will get good relief from this.

 

Irish Moss(Chondrus crispus): This is mainly used in respiratory conditions like bronchitis, because its expectorant properties, encourage the coughing up of phlegm and soothe dry and irritated mucous membranes. It is also used in digestive conditions like acid indigestion, gastritis and urinary infections such as cystitis. When applied externally it provides a soothing relief to inflamed skins.

 

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

Jack-in-the-Pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum):  When used internally this provides relief from whooping cough, asthma and bronchitis. It is used externally to treat snake bite, rheumatism and boils. Boiled in milk it provides a treatment for coughs and tuberculosis.

                                              

Jasmine (Jasminum officinale (J. sambac)): Jasmine  is used to make a tea for treating  sore eyes, wounds, snakebite, headaches, insomnia, and pain due to dislocated joints and rheumatism. The flowers are used to treat hepatitis, cirrhosis of the liver and dysentery.

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Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis (previously I. biflora)): The juice from the broken stem is used to treat poison ivy rash, insect bites, nettle stings, ringworm, sprains, burns, and various skin diseases. An ointment is made from the juice for hemorrhoids, warts and corns.

 

Jimson Weed (Datura stramonium): Jimson Weed is antispasmodic, antiasthmatic, and is good for healing wounds. Externally it is used as a poultice to treat glandular or rheumatic pain. The leaves and seeds used to be smoked for asthma.

Joe Pye (Eupatorium purpurea): The dried flowering tops and leaves are used to help remove bladder stones caused by excessive uric acid. The dried roots are used for pelvic inflammatory disease, gonorrhea, menstrual cramps, gout, rheumatism and prostate and urinary infections. It is combined with other herbs to treat typhoid fever.  

                                                      

Johnny Jump Up (Viola tricolor):  It is normally used in an infusion to treat fevers, hypertension, dry throat, anxiety and nervousness, urinary inflammation, diarrhea, cough and skin eruptions in children. Used as an anti-inflammatory expectorant it relieves whooping cough and acute bronchitis. It is also used to treat cystitis and painful and frequent urination.

Juniper (Juniperus communis):  The green unripe berries are mainly used for urinary infections, arthritis, gout, colic, flatulence, cystitis, stimulate digestion and encourage uterine contractions in labor.

 

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

Kava Kava (Piper methysticum):  Kava Kava is antispasmodic, sedative and anesthetic It is used for treating gout, rheumatism, arthritis, anxiety, urinary infections and irritable bladder problems. It is one of the best pain relieving herbs and can induce lethargy and drowsiness.

 

Khat (Catha edulis): Khat stimulates the brain and spinal cord; it relieves fatigue, reduces depression, dispels the feeling of hunger and promotes communication. It is used for treating diabetes, asthma, and stomach and intestinal tract disorders.

                                      

Khella (Ammi visnaga): This plant has the ability to dilate the coronary arteries. It is used for treating kidney stones, asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, whooping cough and vitiligo. Khella should be taken with care as it may cause nausea and insomnia.

                                         

Knotweed, Common (Polygonum aviculare): It has been used to treat chronic urinary tract infections, colic catarrhs, bronchitis with bleeding and is used in conjunction with other drugs to treat rheumatic conditions, gout and skin diseases. It is also used to treat inflammation of the mucous membrane of the intestinal tract and has been found to be useful in treating flatulence and bilary insufficiency. It has been used externally to treat sore throats and vaginal inflammation. Diarrhea, dysentery, intestinal worms and painful urination have all been treated with this herb

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Knotweed, Japanese (Polygonum cuspidatum): In China, the root was used medicinally to treat menstrual and postpartum difficulties.

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

 

 

Lady's Bedstraw (Galium verum): Lady’s Bedstraw is a slightly bitter remedy for kidney stones, bladder stones, urinary conditions like cystitis and chronic skin conditions.

                                    

Lady's Mantle (Alchemilla vulgaris): The tea is used internally for excessive menstrual bleeding, for prolonged blood loss due to uterine fibroids, to reduce menstrual pain and diarrhea. It is very effective when used as a gargle after teeth extraction, for mouth sores and laryngitis. Externally it can be used to treat skin conditions such as inflamed wounds, rashes, bruises and ruptures. A decoction from the fresh roots is useful in stopping the bleeding from a cut and as an eye wash.                                            

Lady's Slipper (Cypripedium calceolus var. pubescens): Lady’s slipper is used to treat women suffering from emotional and physical imbalance brought on by menopause or menstruation, which causes nervous tension, headaches or cramps. It is also prescribed for depression, mental anxiety and troubled sleep.

                                                         

Lady's Thumb (Polygonum persicaria): The early English folk used Lady’s-thumb as a remedy for sore eyes and ears.

   

Lamb's Ear (Stachys byzantina (S. lanata, S. olympia)): Lamb’s ears make a natural bandage and dressing to staunch bleeding.

Lavender (Lavandula officinalis): Lavender has been used in the treatment of acne, colic, flatulence, giddiness, migraine, nausea, neuralgia, poor appetite, rheumatism, sprains, toothache, intestinal worms and vomiting. It is capable of destroying a wide range of bacterial infections including strep, staph, pneumonia and most flu viruses. Externally it is used as a douche for vaginal infections like candida-type yeast infections. As an ointment it is used to treat burns, bruises, varicose veins and other skin injuries. The oil is also used to stop the itching of insect bites. 

                           

Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis): Lemon Balm is a tranquilizer. It is used for treating blood pressure, heart spasms, nervous stomach, colic, colds, flu and fever. A pad soaked in the infusion is used externally for painful swellings like gout and its ointment is used to treat sores, depression, tension, asthma and bronchitis.

Lemon Verbena (Aloysia triphylla): Used as a tea it soothes bronchial and nasal congestion, reduces indigestion, flatulence, stomach cramps, nausea and palpitations. It is also used to stimulate contractions of the uterus. Milk production by nursing mothers can be enhanced by it and it is also considered to be helpful in infertility.

 

Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citrates)   Lemongrass is a popular herb for treating nervous and digestive problems. It is also used to treat fevers, irregular menstruation, diarrhea, stomach aches, headaches, colds and rheumatic pains. The oil or paste is effective in the treatment of ringworm. It is said to reduce blood pressure and inhibit blood coagulation. 

                                           

Lilac (Syringa vulgaris): Used as a vermifuge in the US and as a tonic anti-periodic and febrifuge; used as a substitute for aloes and in the treatment of malaria.

Linden (Tilia spp):  Linden is well known as a relaxing remedy for treating raised blood pressure associated with arteriosclerosis and nervous tension. It is a good remedy for stress and panic and is specially used to treat nervous palpitations. It is also used for migraine, fevers, colds flu, itchy skin, chills, headache, motion sickness and muscle aches. The fruits are supposed to alleviate chronic asthma and coronary heart disease.

 

Liverwort, Ker-gawl (Hepatica americana, (H. tribola); (H. nobilis): This is hardly used in herbal medicine today but has been used to treat kidney problems and bronchitis. It is an astringent and a diuretic and has been used to stop bleeding in the digestive tract and to stimulate gall bladder production.

Liverleaf (Hepatica acutiloba): The herb has astringent and tonic properties. It also has demulcent activity. The roots and leaves are used dried or fresh in a tea or syrup.

 

Lobelia (Lobelia inflata): Lobelia is a powerful antispasmodic and respiratory stimulant that is used to treat asthma, particularly bronchial asthma and bronchitis. An infusion or tincture when applied externally is useful for sprains and back problems caused by muscle tension. It is also useful in treating bronchitis and whooping cough. Externally it is used as a poultice for sprains, muscle spasms, and insect bites.

                                 
Lomatium (Lomatium dissecta):  Lomatium is used to treat viral infections and bacterial infections like tuberculosis. It has been used to treat colds, flu, pneumonia and infective bronchitis. Externally it is used as a mouthwash and gargle for oral and throat infections, as a douche for bacterial and viral infections and as a wash for infected cuts or wounds.

Lovage ( Ligusticum levisticum): Lovage was used as a tea to soothe bronchitis, promote menstruation and relieve diphtheria. Drinking the dry and powdered roots is said to improve the function of the lymphatic system, reduce obesity, and relieve colic, migraine, jaundice, urinary problems and stomach disorders. It has been used as a mouthwash to soothe tonsillitis and mouth ulcers.

 

Lungwort (Pulmonaria officinalis): Lungwort has been used mainly for lung problems like bronchitis and laryngitis, and to reduce bronchial congestion. It was also used to treat diarrhea and hemorrhoids. As a poultice it is used to treat burns, tumors, enlarged thyroid and to reduce swelling and inflammation from injuries and bruises.

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

Mace (Myristica fragrans): Mace is a carminative, stimulant, and tonic. It aids the digestion and is beneficial to the circulation, relieves nausea and fever. Externally it is used in hair lotions and plasters.

 

Madagascar Periwinkle (Vinca rosea): This has been used to treat wasp stings, stop bleeding, as an eye wash and to treat diabetes. Extracts from the plant have been used to treat leukemia and Hodgkin’s disease.

Madder (Rubia tinctorium): Madder root is used to prevent the formation of kidney and bladder stones, increase bile production and menstruation and as a laxative. It is used in the treatment of urinary tract problems, constipation, diarrhea, and jaundice and bladder disorders. Externally, poultices are applied to wounds to promote healing, particularly of skin ulcers. It is also used to treat anemia, some bleeding conditions, and ailments of the spleen and improve liver functions.                                                        

Maidenhair Fern (Adiantum capillus-veneris (A pedatum North American variety)):  It is used to treat poor circulation of the blood, coughs, bronchitis, excess mucus, sore throat, skin disorders, and chronic nasal congestion. Externally, it is made into poultices to treat eczema, infections and wounds. It is also used as a hair lotion to stimulate hair growth.

                                                                              

Male Fern (Dryopteris filix-mas (Syn Aspidium filix-mas)): This herb is one of the most effective herbs for intestinal worms, especially tape worms. Externally, it is made into a salve for treating wounds, sores, boils, carbuncles, swollen glands, epidemic flu and is rubbed into the limbs of children with rickets. It inhibits bleeding and is mixed with other herbs to treat toxic blood conditions.

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Mallow, Common (Malva sylvestris): Mallow is useful in the treatment of painful swellings and is used as a digestive and diuretic herb. Taken internally, the leaves reduce stomach irritation, aids recovery from gastritis and stomach ulcers, laryngitis and pharyngitis, upper respiratory catarrh and bronchitis and have a laxative effect. It is used externally in a lotion to treat acne and the leaves if rubbed on the affected area, will ease the pain of wasp sting. The roots may be given to children to ease teething.

Marjoram, Sweet (Origanum majorana): Marjoram tea aids digestion, increases sweating and encourages menstruation. It is an antioxidant and helps to preserve foods. When used as a steam inhalant it clears the sinuses and eases laryngitis. It is good for gastritis and made into a weak tea for colic in children. It is also made into a poultice for rheumatic pains.

 

Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris): This herb has been used to control fits, treat dropsy and urinary infections. Tea made from the roots induces sweating, is an emetic and expectorant. Tea made from the leaves is a diuretic and laxative.

 

Marshmallow (Althea officinalis): It is used to treat excess stomach acid, peptic ulcers and gastritis. It reduces the inflammation of gallstones and is also used for colitis, diverticulitis and irritable bowel syndrome. It is used in formulae for arthritis, infections, vermifuge, female tonic and laxative. Taken as a warm infusion it helps cystitis and frequent urination. It gives relief to dry coughs, bronchial asthma, bronchial congestion and pleurisy. An ointment is prepared from the roots to treat boils and abscesses, and it is also made into a mouthwash for inflammation. The root boiled in milk is used for treating diarrhea and dysentery as well as enriching the milk of nursing mothers and increasing its flow. It also protects and soothe the mucous membranes.       

Mastic (Pistacia lentiscus): Mastic is a stimulant and diuretic. In recent years it is mostly use for filling teeth and making varnishes. Oil made from it is very helpful in treating varicose veins but it is expensive and foul smelling.

Mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum): Mayapple is a very strong glandular stimulant and is used for treating chronic liver diseases, promoting bile flow and digestion and in the elimination of obstructions and skin problems. The root is used as a tonic for liver, lung and stomach ailments. A decoction of the roots is used to treat rheumatism, to stimulate the glands and for gastrointestinal disorders.                                

Meadow Rue (Thalictrum aquilegifolium): Meadow rue is a purgative and diuretic.  It is a bitter digestive tonic that contains berberine or a similar alkaloid.  The leaves were sometimes added to spruce beer in the 19th century as a digestive tonic.

 

Meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria): Meadowsweet is used to treat rheumatism, fevers, and pain and prevents over acidity in the stomach. It is considered to be one of the best herbal treatment for heartburn. It is an antiseptic diuretic that causes the excretion of uric acid and is used for urinary tract problems, to improve digestion and to heal ulcers. It is a good remedy for cystitis, urethritis, fluid retention and kidney problems. Meadowsweet softens deposits in the body such as kidney stones and gravel, as well as arteriosclerosis in the arteries.

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Melilot (Melilotus officinalis):  Melilot helps to reduce the risk of phlebitis and thrombosis and can help varicose veins and hemorrhoids It is also used to treat gas, indigestion, bronchitis, rheumatic pain and problems of menopause. Externally it is used in poultices and salves for boils, swellings, arthritis, rheumatism and headaches. The tea is used to wash sores and wounds and is an anti-inflammatory eye wash. Melilot made into herb pillows can be used for joint pains and headaches.

 

Mexican Marigold Mint (Tagetes lucida): Used internally for diarrhea, indigestion, nausea, colic, hiccups, malaria, and feverish illnesses. Externally, it is used for scorpion bites and to remove ticks.

Mexican Poppy (Argemone mexicana): The fresh latex of Mexican poppy is used to treat warts, cold sores, and blemishes on the lips. The whole plant acts as a mild painkiller. The flowers are expectorant and are used to treat coughs and other chest congestion. It is also used for treating prostate inflammation and irritability of the urethra.

 

Milk Thistle (Silybum Marianum): This herb is poorly soluble in water therefore teas and decoctions from it have very little effect except in gallbladder treatment. It must be concentrated for it to have any effect when taken orally. Its main use however is for treating liver disorders

Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca): A decoction from the roots (either fresh or dried) is used for heart conditions, as a stomach tonic, as an emetic and for intestinal worms. It is also used to treat arthritis which is aggravated by the cold, coughs, asthma, and bronchitis, inflammation of the lungs, colds, female disorders, diarrhea and gastric mucus. It is thought to be an expectorant and diuretic and is used for nerve problems and urinary tract conditions. Externally the milky sap is used to treat warts.             .

Miner’s Lettuce (Montia perfoliata): Apart from its value as a nourishing vegetable, Miner’s Lettuce may be taken as a spring tonic and an effective diuretic.  

Mint (Mentha spp):  Mint has been used for many years as a tonic and digestive aid and for treating colds, cough, and fever. The tea is used to treat bile and liver conditions and to soothe the stomach. Peppermint contains antioxidants that help in cases of heart disease and skin rashes like measles. It is useful in making lozenges and sprays for sore throats. Oil of Peppermint is antimicrobial and antiviral. It contains menthol, which is a local anesthetic and when added to lotions have a soothing effect on the skin.                                                        .

Mistletoe (Viscum album): Mistletoe contains properties that have the ability to slow the pulse, stimulate uterine and gastrointestinal contractions and lower blood pressure. It is used to treat colds, muscle weakness and arthritis. It aids digestion, is a laxative, a sedative and is used to relax the uterus during pregnancy. It relieves headaches and is a treatment for tinnitus and epilepsy.

                                                       

Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca): Motherwort is an herb that is used for several heart conditions. It has been used to decrease the level of fat in the blood, decrease clotting, and slow heart palpitations and rapid heartbeat. It also reduces blood pressure and decreases muscle spasm. The uneasiness associated with childbirth, postpartum depression and menopause are all treated with Motherworth. It is also used to treat rheumatism, bronchitis, asthma, fevers, nervousness and delirium. It strengthens and relaxes the uterine muscles and eases uterine cramping, cools the body system and aids in the control of menstrual conditions.

Mouse Ear (Pilosella officinarum): Mouse Ear is primarily used to treat pulmonary conditions. It relaxes the muscles of the bronchial tubes, stimulates the cough reflex and reduces the production of mucus,  It is considered a primary treatment for whooping cough, bronchitis and bronchial asthma. It is a diuretic and an astringent and is used to counter the production of mucus throughout the respiratory system. It is also used to control heavy menstrual bleeding and to ease the coughing up of blood. Externally it is used to heal wounds, and to treat hernias and fractures. A tea made from it is sometimes used for fever and diarrhea.                                                                   

Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris): This herb is used to treat premenstrual symptoms when used in a tea and in the bath.  It cleanses the liver, enhances digestion and is helpful in treating epilepsy, palsy, and hysteria. It is also helpful in fevers.

Muira Puama (Ptychopetalum olacoides (Liriosma ovata)) is a different species but often used interchangeably): This is used for treating sexual debility, impotence, rheumatism, influenza and cardiac and gastrointestinal weakness. It has also been found helpful in dysentery, hookworm, paralysis and menstrual disturbances.                         

Mullein (Verbascum thrapsis): As one of the primary herbs for lung problems, it has been used to treat whooping cough, asthma, bronchitis and chest colds. It is a diuretic and  has also been used to treat diarrhea, colitis, bleeding in the bowel, inflammation and urinary tract inflammation. A preparation extracted from the flowers is used for insect bites, bruises, hemorrhoids, sore joints and to reduce the pain and inflammation of earache. A poultice of the flowers is used for burns, ringworm, boils and sores. The leaves are also used for migrane and headaches.   

Myrrh (Commiphora myrrha): Myrrh improves digestion, diarrhea and immunity. It is used to treat coughs, gum disease, wounds, candida, overactive thyroid and scanty menstruation, asthma, bronchitis, arthritis, rheumatism, ulcerated surfaces, anemia and pyorrhea. It is also used to treat stomach complaints, tonsillitis, diabetes and gingivitis. Externally it is used to treat ulcers, boils and wounds.  

 

Myrtle (Myrtus communis): The plant is powerfully antiseptic owing to the myrtol it contains and it has good astringent properties.  In medicine the leaves were used for their stimulating effect on the mucous membranes, and for the chest pains and dry coughs of consumptive people.

 

 

 

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

 

Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus): Nasturtium is an antiseptic and digestive herb that is used to treat respiratory and urinary disorders. The seeds are crushed to make poultices for boils and sores.                    

Nepitella (Calamintha nepeta): Calamintha is used to treat fevers and help to cure jaundice. It is an expectorant and is effective when applied to snake bites and insect stings.                          .

Neroli (Citrus aurantium ssp. Aurantium): This fruit is strongly acid and is used to stimulate the digestion and relieve flatulence. It is rich in vitamin C and this helps the immune system to fight off infections. It soothes headaches, calms palpitations and lowers fevers.                                   

Nettles (Urtica dioica): Nettle leaves make a blood tonic which is useful in treating anemia and poor circulation of the blood. It lowers blood sugar, reduces uric acid, and is a treatment for gout and arthritis. It acts as a diuretic and mild laxative and is used for asthma, dropsy, and to increase mother’s milk and decrease excessive menstruation. Externally it is used as a poultice for eczema and other skin conditions.                                

New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americanus): The bark of the red roots was used as a sedative, stimulant, and antispasmodic and for treating respiratory diseases. It was also used to treat high blood pressure and enlarged spleens. The plant is used to treat gonorrhea, dysentery and an eye disease in children. The root is reported to be a stimulant, a sedative, and a means of loosening phlegm. It has been reportedly used for various chest problems including chronic bronchitis, asthma, whooping cough and tuberculosis. Externally it is used as a gargle for inflammation and irritations of the mouth and throat especially for swollen tonsils, enlarged lymph nodes and chronic enlargement of the adenoids.

Nigella (Nigella sativa): Nigella is considered carminative, a stimulant, and diuretic. It is used to treat liver disease, bronchial asthma, eczema, rheumatism, coughs, colds and colic. The seeds are put to many uses such as treating intestinal worms, skin eruptions, increasing breast milk, treating scorpion stings and repelling insects. 

 

 

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

 

 

Orach(e) (Atriplex hortensis, A. patula): Considered diuretic, emetic, and emollient, it has been used for lung ailments and to cure jaundice. It has also provided some relief from gout, sore throats and tumors

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Orris (Iris x germanica var. florentina): Orris was formerly used in upper respiratory tract catarrh, coughs and for diarrhea in infants.  It was used to treat dropsy and has been used as a snuff for congestive headaches. 

 

Osha (Ligusticum porteri): This herb has been used to treat various types of respiratory conditions like pneumonia, influenza, colds, bronchitis, tuberculosis, hay fever and asthma. It is also used to treat flu, fever, cough, indigestion, gas, delayed menses and rheumatic complaints.

 

Oxeye Daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare (Chrysanthemum leucanthemum)): Used for gastrointestinal, throat, skin, women’s circulatory and urinary concerns.  Make into infusions, tinctures, ointments, salves, foot soaks and as a bath herb.

 

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

Parsley (Petroselinum crispum, P. sativum): The leaves have been used to treat tumors, contusions, insect bites, lice, skin parasites and as a lotion for the scalp to promote hair growth. Internally it is used for dysentery, gallstones, diseases of the liver, prostate and spleen, in the treatment of anemia and arthritis, as an expectorant, aphrodisiac, laxative and antimicrobial. It stimulates the appetite and increases the blood flow to the digestive organs. It has also been used to treat gout, rheumatism colic and flatulence. Oil from the seed has been used to induce menstruation. 

Partridge Berry (Mitchella repens): It is a safe and nourishing remedy for women from puberty to menopause and can be safely taken during pregnancy and while breast feeding. It is useful to reduce the pain from painful periods and for uterine blood loss of any kind. It improves digestion, calms the nervous system and has been used for urinary tract infections.

Pasque Flower (Pulsatilla vulgaris): This is a good remedy for disorder of the reproductive organs and the prostate. It is used as an anti-inflammatory and is specific in the treatment of dysentery. It is generally used to increase blood and energy circulation. It is used to treat menstrual irregularity and externally as a douche for trichomonas. Various inflammatory conditions have been treated with it, but especially if accompanied by nervousness, despondency, sadness and depression. It is also used to treat headache, insomnia, neuralgia, stomach disorders from over-indulgence in fats and pastries, diarrhea, constipation, toothache and styes.

Passionflower (Passiflora incarnate):  The leaves of Passionflower are widely used to treat nervous disorders such as heart palpitations, anxiety, convulsions, epilepsy and high blood pressure. It appears to be especially helpful when physical or mental strain results in insomnia or stress. It is used to prevent spasms from whooping cough, asthma, and other diseases.  The dried herb is also used for Parkinson’s disease, hysteria, and shingles.  The unusual fruit has been historically considered to be a sedative and sleep inducer. It is used for nervous restlessness, mild disorders of sleeplessness, and gastrointestinal disorders of nervous origin, tenseness, restlessness, and irritability with difficulty in falling asleep.

Patchouli (Pogostemom patchouli): The herb is used to treat colds, headaches, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain and halitosis. It is also used as an antidote to poisonous snakebites.

Pellitory (Anacyclus pyrethrum): Pellitory is regarded as having a restorative action on the kidneys, supporting and strengthening their function and has been used for nephritis, chronic kidney stones, renal colic, cystitis, and edema .It is also occasionally taken as a laxative and it counteracts mucus and fights chronic coughs. The leaves may be applied as poultices.

Pellitory of the Wall (Parietaria officinalis): The pungent Pellitory root is taken as a decoction to treat paralysis and epilepsy. It may also be used as a gargle for sore throats. The root is chewed for toothache and was found to be helpful in some rheumatic and neuralgic problems of the face and head and in palsy of the tongue.                                                             

Pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium or Hedeoma puleioides): Pennyroyal’s main role is as an insect repellent. The tea however, is used to reduce fever when taken hot and can be used for headaches, indigestion, congestion from colds and menstrual pain. It is an ovarian tonic which also eases cramps, eliminates gas, calms nausea and relieves nervous tension. Externally the crushed leaves are rubbed on insect bites to reduce  itching and prevent future attacks and is also used to make a lotion to soothe itching and burning skin. The, diaphoretic, and antiseptic, used for colds, fevers, headaches, and sunstroke.  Pennyroyal is a renewing wash for itching, burning skin. 

Pepper (Piper nigrum): Pepper is an ingredient for stimulating the appetite and aids in the relief of nausea and vertigo.  It was used to treat gastro-intestinal upsets, flatulence, fevers and congestive chills, as well as anal, rectal and urinal problems

Perilla (Perilla frutescens (green): Perilla is effective in  improving stomach functions and  is also used for perspiration, fever and cough alleviation, pain removing and stomach function improvement in Oriental medicine.


Perilla (Perilla frutescens): This is mainly used to prevent allergic reactions like in cases of asthma and hay fever and allergic skin diseases.

Periwinkle (Vinca Major and V minor): This plant is an excellent all round astringent which can be used internally or externally.  It is used internally for treating excessive menstrual flow, inflammation of the colon, diarrhea, hysteria, fits and nervous states. Externally it is used as a douche for treating vaginal infections, nose bleed, bleeding gums, mouth ulcers and as a gargle for sore throats and tonsillitis. The leaves are made into an ointment for hemorrhoids and inflammations.                                                                      

Peruvian Balsam (Myroxlon pereirae): Balsam of Peru has been used for bronchitis, laryngitis, dysmenorrhea, diarrhea, dysentery and leucorrhea. These days it is used in preparations for wounds, scabies, ulcers and can be found in hair tonics, anti-dandruff preparations, feminine hygiene sprays and as a fragrance in soaps, detergents, creams lotions and perfumes. It has a strong vanilla-like fragrance which finds application in food flavorings and cosmetics. It is strongly antiseptic and is usually taken internally as an expectorant and decongestant for emphysema, bronchitis and bronchial asthma. It stimulates the heart, increases blood pressure and lessens mucus secretions. It is also used in treating scabies, diaper rash, bed sores, eczema, sore nipples and wounds.

 Pipsissewa (Chimaphila umbellate): Pipsissewa was used for various problems like rheumatism, urinary infections, prostate problems, cystitis, urethritis, kidney stones, arthritis, gonorrhea and rheumatism. Externally the fresh leaves may be applied to rheumatic joints or muscles, as well as to blisters, sores and swellings

Plantain (Plantago major and Planceolata): Common plantain used externally  quickly staunches blood flow and encourages the repair of damaged tissue. An ointment or lotion may be used to treat hemorrhoids, fistulae and ulcers. It is diuretic, expectorant and a decongestant and is normally used to treat gastritis, peptic ulcers, diarrhea, dysentery, irritable bowel syndrome, urinary tract bleeding, loss of voice and respiratory congestion. Externally the fresh juice can be used to make a vaginal douche. The tea can be used to treat urinary problems, dysentery, hepatitis, lung problems especially asthma and bronchitis.

 

Pleurisy Root (Asclepias tuberosa): Butterfly weed was used as a remedy for all sorts of lung ailments, including bronchitis, tuberculosis, typhoid fever, and pleurisy.  It relieves  congestion, inflammation, difficult breathing and reduces fevers, diarrhea and dysentery. Fresh roots made into a poultice have proven helpful for rheumatism, inflammation, bruises, wounds and the stopping of bleeding.

                                                                  

Ploughman’s Spikenard (Inula conyza): Ploughman's Spikenard is a good wound herb, and when taken in a decoction relieves bruises, ruptures, wounds, pains in the side and difficulty in breathing. It has also been used for treating itch and other skin conditions.

Poke (Phytolacca americana): Poke root is made into a decoction or ointment to treat various skin diseases such as eczema, ulcers, ringworm, scabies and other fungus infections. It is also helpful in treating rheumatism, arthritis, swellings, chronic sores, constipation and degenerative diseases.

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Pomegranate (Punica granatum):  This is used to treat intestinal worms. It is also helpful in diarrhea, upset stomach, flatulence and dysentery. The seeds are used to prepare a gargle. 

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Poppy (Papaver somniferum): Morphine, heroin, codeine and papaverine are all made from the Poppy. It is used in poultices to treat earache, toothache, sprains, bruises, inflammation and excessive redness of the skin. The products of Poppy are all very strong pain killers and are used in different ways to relieve discomfort. It has hypnotic and sedative effects and is quite often used to calm excitement and reduce respiratory depression. It is also a very strong cough suppressant.

 

Psyllium (Plantago psyllium): Psyllium is a well-known laxative and is used to treat many bowel problems like irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. It is prescribed in conventional as well as herbal medicine for constipation, hemorrhoids, dysentery, stomach and duodenal ulcers and acid indigestion. It is also used for coughs, high blood pressure, urethritis and bloody urine. Externally it is used to make poultices for boils, abscesses and whitlows.

                                     

Purslane (Portulaca oleracea): Purslane is a diuretic which is invaluable in treating urinary and digestive problems. It is a soothing remedy for gastrointestinal conditions such as dysentery and diarrhea. It is high in Omega 3 acids which make it an ideal treatment for high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, clotting problems and inflammation and may increase immunity. Externally the leaves are used to treat earaches, stings, swellings, sore gums and burns.

 

 

 

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Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

 

Radish (Raphanus sativus): Radish juice is a tonic and laxative which stimulates the digestion, appetite and the flow of bile. The leaves and seeds are used to treat asthma and other chest complaints. It is also a remedy for kidney and bladder stones and gravel as well as breaking up congestion, coughs and wheezing.

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Ragweed (Ambrosia trifida): Ragweed has been used to treat gonorrhea, diarrhea, intestinal worms, fever, pneumonia, nausea, intestinal cramps, menstrual disorders and stroke. It is used externally for insect bites, various skin complaints and infected toes.

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Ragwort (Senecio jacobaea): Ragwort gives quick relief when taken as an infusion for gout and rheumatic pains. It is also used to treat lung and bronchial infections, as well as internal bruising. Externally, an ointment from it treats rheumatism and the juice is used as a wash for burns, sores, cancerous ulcers, eye inflammation, bee stings and a gargle for ulcerated mouths and throats.

                                                                       

Ramps (Allium tricoccum): Ramps is used as a tonic and for treating colds, sore throat and worms in children. A warm juice from the leaves and bulb is used externally for earaches.

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Ramsons (Allium ursinum): Ramsons cleanses the blood and intestines. It also lowers high blood pressure, fights arteriosclerosis, treats diarrhea, colic gas, indigestion, loss of appetite, asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, acne, fungus, eczema and threadworms. The juice is a mild irritant when applied externally and has been used to treat rheumatic and arthritic joints.

                                                                                                                                         

Raspberry (Rubus idaeus): The leaves are the most valuable medicinal part of the plant and provide a tea for pregnant mothers, which when taken in the last three months of pregnancy, strengthens the uterus, ease the pain of contractions during labor as well as checking any hemorrhage. Externally the roots and leaves are used to prepare a gargle to treat tonsillitis and mouth inflammations, and a poultice and wash for sores, conjunctivitis, minor wounds, burns and varicose ulcers.                    

Rattlesnake Master (Eryngium yuccifolium): The roots have been used for liver ailments, to increase urine flow, to induce vomiting, and to treat rattlesnake bite. It has been used to treat dropsy, syphilis, pulmonary affections, inflammations and malaria.            The roots have been used for rheumatism, respiratory ailments, kidney problems, muscular pains, loss of erectile power, sexual exhaustion and the treatment of female reproductive disorders.                                         .

Rau Rom (Vietnamese Coriander Polygonum odoratum): This is used for nausea, fever and to promote urination. Externally, an infusion from the rhizome has been used to make a gargle for ulcers and gingivitis and applied to cuts sores and hemorrhoids.

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Red Angel's Trumpet (Brugmansia sanguinea): Known extensively throughout South America for its medicinal virtues and ritually brewed with Trichocereous pachanoi as one interpretation of Cimora.  In Ecuador it is currently being cultivated for scopolamine.

Red Clover (Trifolium pratense): This is used for treating asthma, water retention, whooping cough, tuberculosis, eczema, psoriasis, gout and dry cough. Externally it provides a salve for ulcers and a wash for sores and other skin infections.

                                               

Red Maple (Acer rubrum): An infusion of the bark has been used as a tonic, a treatment for intestinal worms, cramps and dysentery. It has also been used to make poultices for skin abrasions.

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Red Sage (Salvia viridis (syn Salvia horminum)): Red Sage is used as a gargle to relieve inflammation of the mouth, gums, tonsils, tongue, throat, laryngitis, pharyngitis, and quinsy. It is used for dyspepsia and may be used to reduce the production of milk in nursing mothers.

 

Redbud  (Cercis canadensis, C. siliquastrum)  The redbud’ inner bark and root can be made into a tea or decoction to clear lung congestion, for whooping cough, fevers, diarrhea, dysentery, leukemia, nausea and vomiting.

Redroot Pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus): The leaves have been used to stop internal hemorrhaging, diarrhea, hoarseness, ulcers and excessive menstrual flow. The flowers, roots and leaves have been used as a wash for wounds and sores and as a mouthwash for canker sores and sore gums.

Rest Harrow (Ononis spinosa):  An infusion is used in the treatment of dropsy, inflammation of the bladder and kidneys, rheumatism, gout, cystitis, fluid retention and chronic skin disorders.  A cough mixture is also made from it.

Resurrection Plant (Bryophyllum pinnatum): This is used as a poultice for sprains, eczema, infections, burns; carbuncle and boils. This is not to be taken internally..

Rhatany (Krameria triandra): Rhatany is a powerful astringent and may be used for diarrhea, hemorrhoids and hemorrhages. Externally it is used in toothpaste and powders for bleeding gums. It can be quite effective when used in the form of an ointment, suppository or wash for treating hemorrhoids. It may also be applied to wounds to stop blood flow, to varicose veins and over areas of capillary weakness that may be prone to easy bruising As a gargle it can be used as a remedy for chronic sore throat.               

Rhubarb Root (Rheum palmatum): This is used to treat constipation, dysentery, hemorrhoids, skin eruptions, blood in the stool, duodenal ulcers, appetite loss, diarrhea and intestinal worms. It is used externally to counteract blood clots, promote healing, to enhance menstruation and for burns, boils and carbuncles. Used as a mouthwash it relieves canker sores.

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Rice Paddy Herb (Limnophila aromatica):  The plant is used to treat pain, to improve appetite, as an expectorant to clear mucus from the respiratory tract, for fevers, dysentery, indigestion, elephantiasis, worms and menstrual problems. It can also be used to make a poultice for sore legs and wounds.

                         

Rocambole (Allium scorodoprasum): The bulb is used in the treatment of abscesses, amoebic dysentery, bronchitis, cholera, dysentery, influenza, skin diseases and tuberculosis.

 

Rock Sweet Flag (Acorus gramineus): This herb is used for poor appetite, gastritis, excess mucus, depression, epilepsy, indigestion, to stimulate the digestive system, clear the bronchial passage and has a mild sedative effect. The root is powdered and used for bleeding gums.

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Rocket (Hesperis matronalis): The leaves are antiscorbutic, diaphoretic and diuretic.

 

Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis): A tea made from the dried fermented leaves is used in the treatment of allergies especially eczema, hay fever and asthma in children. Externally it is used for skin infections and irritations.

 

Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa): The leaves and flowers are used internally as a tonic tea for digestive and kidney functions and as a cough remedy. Externally the leaves are used as a poultice for abscesses.

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis): Rosemary leaves increase circulation, reduce headaches and fight bacterial and fungal infections.  It is recommended for flatulence, heartburn, and to stimulate the digestive system, liver, intestinal tract and the gallbladder. It is also used to inhibit kidney and bladder stone formation, to ease headache, migraine, epilepsy, vertigo and debility. Externally it is used as a gargle for gum problems, sore throat and canker sores.                                         . 
              

Roseroot (Rhodiola rosea): Roseroot has been used to treat stress, depression, tuberculosis and heart disease, to regulate blood sugar and to protect the liver from environmental toxin. It has also been used to stimulate the appetite, aid respiration, boost the mental state, regulate heartbeat and counter heart arrhythmias. Externally, it is applied to the gums to stop pyorrhea.

 

Rose (Rosa spp): Dried Rose petal tea has been used for headache, dizziness, mouth sores and menstrual cramps. It also clears mucous discharge, relieves constriction of the chest and abdomen, and stimulates the appetite, for diarrhea, frequent urination and other diseases of the kidney. It is used externally for poultices to treat skin wounds and inflammations.

                              

Rowan (Sorbus aucuparia): The juice has been used to treat hemorrhoids, excessive vaginal discharge, diarrhea, painful menstruation, constipation and kidney disorders. It can also be used as a gargle for sore throats and laryngitis.

 

Royal Fern (Osmunda regalis): The roots have been used to treat dysentery, coughs, pulmonary diseases, intestinal worms and jaundice. The fronds are used to make compresses for external application to wounds and rheumatic joints

  

Rue (Ruta graveolens): Rue has been used as a treatment for hypertension, diabetes, allergic reactions, earache, heart palpitations, nervous indigestion, cramps and colic. The leaves are made into poultices and salves for the external relief of sciatica, gout, rheumatic pains, snakebites, insect bites, strains, sprains, inflammation and fomentations of the tea are placed on the chest to help bronchitis.

                                  

Rupturewort (Herniaria glabra): The whole plant, gathered when in flower, is astringent, very actively diuretic and expectorant. It is used to treat dropsy, catarrh of the bladder, cystitis, kidney stones and hernia. Externally, it is used as a poultice to heal ulcers.    

 

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius): Safflower has been used to treat coronary artery disease, jaundice, fevers, measles, post-natal abdominal pains or clots, traumatic injuries, stiffness and pain in the joints and menstrual and menopausal problems. It was used externally for sprains, skin inflammation, bruising, boils and painful or paralyzed joints. 

                                        

Saffron (Crocus sativus): Saffron has been used for measles, uterine bleeding, indigestion colic, period pain and to induce menstruation. It also counteracts inflammation, stimulates blood circulation and has a regulating effect on the liver, heart and spleen.

                                                   

Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentate): A tea made from the leaves has been used to treat headache, stomachache, vomiting, diarrhea, sore throat, and as an antidote for poisoning. Externally a wash was prepared to treat cuts, bullet wounds and to bathe newborn babies. A poultice was also used to induce menstruation, relieve colic, kill worms, treat rheumatism and sore throats

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Salad Burnet (Sanguisorba minor): This plant has been used to heal wounds and treat gout and rheumatism, for blood in the stool, dysentery, bleeding, hemorrhoids and menorrhagia. Externally, it is mixed with sesame oil to treat burns, eczema and pruritus.  

Salep (Orchis mascula): It is a nourishing vegetable which was once believed to be an aphrodisiac. It is now used however for kidney disorders and to treat diarrhea and irritated gastrointestinal tracts in children.

Salvia Divinorum   This is used to treat colds, sore throats, constipation and diarrhea. There are however, no accepted uses for it in current medical practice

Samphire (Crithmum maritimum): Samphire is a good diuretic and is thought to relieve flatulence and to help the digestive system. It has a high vitamin C content and was at one time recommended to cure kidney stones.          .

 Sampson's Snakeroot (Gentiana villosa): Sampson’s Snakeroot is a well respected antidote for snake bites and bites from rabid dogs. It has also been used to treat gout and rheumatism, stimulate the appetite and help digestion.

Sandalwood (Santalum album): Sandalwood has been used internally for gonorrhea, chronic bronchitis, bladder infections, kidney inflammations, vomiting, laryngitis, sore throat, hiccups, dry coughs and prostatitis. The oil when applied to the body is used for fevers, infection, rashes and itchy skin.

              

Sandwort (Spergularia rubra): This herb acts as a diuretic and has been used to treat bladder inflammation and bladder stones. It is also used for kidney stones, acute and chronic cystitis and catarrh of the bladder.  

                                            

Sanicle (Sanicula europaea): Sanicle has been used for bleeding in the stomach and intestines, the coughing up of blood, chest and lung complaints, dropsy, skin problems, nosebleeds, dysentery and diarrhea. Externally it may be used as a poultice or ointment for wounds, burns’ hemorrhoids’ inflamed skin and rashes.                                                            

Sarsaparilla (Smilax regelii): Sarsaparilla has been used to treat liver problems, rheumatism, chronic hepatic disorders, gonorrhea, syphilis and herpes. It is anti-inflammatory and can be used externally for skin problems such as eczema, psoriasis, itching of the skin.

Sassafras (Sassafras albidum): Sassafras has been used for treating high blood pressure, rheumatism, arthritis, gout, menstrual and kidney problems, ulcers and acne. It is a diuretic that is slightly laxative and has been used to improve digestion, and increase sweating in cases of fever, flu and measles and decrease mother’s milk.  It is used externally to make a wash for bathing sores, killing head lice, treating poison ivy and oak itching and as a mouthwash and eyewash

Sassy Bark (Erythrophleum guineense): It is a narcotic that has laxative effects. In some cases it has been given in cases of mitral disease and dropsy.

Savory (Satureja hortensis and S. montana): Savory is primarily a culinary herb and is sometimes added to medicines because of its aroma. It has been used for colic, flatulence, diarrhea and it stimulates the appetite. It is used externally for bee stings. It can also be make into a poultice for the treatment of colds and chest ailments like asthma and sniffed to relieve headaches.

    

Saw palmetto (Seronoa repens): This makes a good tonic for strengthening and building the body. It is used for men to treat impotence and enlarged and weakened prostate. In women it increases breast size and secreting ability, relieves ovarian and uterine complaints and frigidity. Generally it is used to improve the digestion, stimulate the appetite, for colds, nose congestion, asthma, fluid retention, bronchitis, diabetes, infection of the gastro-urinary tract and aids the thyroid glands.                                                             

Scammony Root (Ipomoea orizabensis): Scammony Root is a well known and effective purgative which produces large amounts of evacuation. It causes considerable pain when taken in large doses and should not be used by persons suffering from gastric or intestinal inflammation.

                                

Scarlet Pimpernel (Anagallis arvensis):  This is not in common use today but has been used in the past to help recovery from coughs and flu. It has also been used for dropsy, mental problems, ulcers, skin eruptions, and disorders of the liver and gallbladder. It can be applied externally for sores, ulcers and other skin conditions.

                                   

Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris): Scot's Pine has quite a number of uses in medicine and has been used in cases of bronchitis, sinusitis, upper respiratory catarrh, asthma, rheumatism, arthritis and kidney and bladder problems. The leaves and shoots are diuretic, antiseptic and expectorant. They are used externally to prepare liniments and plasters which will soothe skin irritations and heal cuts and bruises.

 

Screwpine ): Screwpine is restorative, deodorant, and promotes a feeling of well being. It is Pandanus odoratissimus used in oral hygiene to sweeten the breath and externally as a poultice to treat boils. 

                      

Scurvy Grass (Cochlearia officinalis): The young plant has a diuretic effect and is useful in cases of malnutrition. It is also used to treat rheumatism, dropsy vaginal discharge and constipation. It can be used for making a juice to be used externally in the form of a mouthwash for canker sores and also applied to spots and pimples.                                                    

Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides): Sea Buckthorn berries are very high in vitamin C and are used for the treatment of stomach and duodenal ulcers, eye diseases, gingivitis, colds, high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, febrile conditions and exhaustion. Externally it is used as a wash for skin irritations and eruptions. An oil made from it is also used to treat burns and bed sores.  It is used in medicines and cosmetic preparations.

Sea Holly (Eryngium maritimum): Sea Holly is a diuretic and is used in the treatment of urethritis, cystitis, enlargement or inflammation of the prostate gland, kidney stones and chest problems. It will also ease colic due to urinary problems and reduce hemorrhage

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Sea Wormwood (Artemisia maritima): This is particularly effective in destroying Ascaris worms and other intestinal parasites that quite often infest children. It is also used as a tonic for the digestive system and to treat intermittent fever.

 

Seagrape (Coccoloba uvifera): The fruits have been used to reduce fever while the roots are used for diarrhea. An extract from the bark is used for dysentery while a gum from it is used for throat problems.

 

Sedge (Cyperus rotundus):  This herb is used to treat pain and spasms mainly in the uterus and digestive system. It is also used for menstrual complaints, gas, bloating, colds, depression and moodiness.                                                               

Self-Heal (Prunella vulgaris): Self-Heal has been used to stop hemorrhage and to decrease excessive menstruation. It has also been used for jaundice, sore and swollen eyeballs, headache, dizziness, gout, high blood pressure, fevers and vertigo. It is used externally for minor injuries, sores, burns, bruises, mouth inflammation, sore throat, poison ivy, insect bites and stings. It is used for some liver ailments and for enlarged or infected glands, especially the lymph nodes of the neck.

Seneca Snakeroot (Polygala senega): It is a very good expectorant that has been used to treat bronchial asthma. The roots stimulate the bronchial mucous membranes to initiate coughing which will ease the wheezing. It stimulates secretion and a tea made from the bark will cause miscarriage.

Senna (Cassia senna (Senna alexandrina): Senna has been specifically used to aid constipation. It is also indicated for colic, kidney and bladder problems and to remove faeces from the intestines. Both the leaves and the pods can be used but the leaves are much more potent

Sesame (Sesamum indicum): Sesame leaves are used to treat kidney and bladder conditions, dysentery, diarrhea and wind. The seeds are used for dizziness, tinnitus, blurred vision, constipation, and to stimulate the production of breast milk. The roots have been used to treat coughs and asthma. Externally, the leaves are used to make eye and skin lotions. The oil is used in the cosmetic industry.

                                                             

Shatavari (Asparagus racemosus): Shatavari is an herb that has been used for infertility, loss of libido, threatened miscarriage, menopausal problems, hyperacidity, dysentery, stomach ulcers and bronchial infections. It supplies many female hormones and therefore is invaluable to women who have had hysterectomies or have reached menopause. It nourishes and cleanses the blood and female reproductive organs. It is used externally for sores and stiffness in the joints and neck.

 

Sheep’s Sorrel (Rumex acetosella):  A tea made from the leaves is used for scurvy, fevers, inflammation, skin disorders and as a liver stimulant. Tea from the roots is useful in the treatment of diarrhea and excessive menstrual bleeding. The leaves are mildly laxative and in the future may provide relief from some gastrointestinal problems. The leaves make a poultice for tumors

 

Shepherd’s Purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris or Thlaspi bursa-pastoris): When dried and infused, it provides a tea for stopping hemorrhages of the stomach, lungs, and especially of the kidneys. It is diuretic and astringent and is given to disinfect the urinary tract in cases of cystitis. It is also taken for diarrhea, hypertension, varicose veins, hemorrhoids, fevers and postpartum bleeding.

 

Siberian Ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus):  Siberian Ginseng seems to have a general tonic effect on the body, in particular on the adrenal glands, helping the body to withstand heat, cold, infection, other physical stresses and radiation  .  Siberian Ginseng is given to improve mental resilience, and to reduce the effects of physical stress. It is most effective in the treatment of prolonged exhaustion and debility, resulting from overwork and long-term stress.  The herb also stimulates immune resistance and can be taken in convalescence to aid recovery from chronic illness.  As a general tonic, Siberian Ginseng helps both to prevent infection and to maintain well-being.  It is also used in treatments for impotence.

 

Silver Birch (Betula pendula (B. verrucosa, B. alba)): An infusion of Silver Birch leaves speeds up the elimination of waste products via the urine, and is used to treat kidney stones and bladder stones, rheumatic conditions, and gout. The leaves are also used, in combination with diuretic herbs, to reduce fluid retention and swelling. The sap is a mild diuretic and was used to treat skin diseases like acne as well as rheumatism and gout. Externally, a decoction of the bark can be used as a lotion for chronic skin problems and also combined with oil to make a treatment for rheumatic joints.

 

Silverweed (Potentilla anserine): The dried flowering stems of this plant are used to make an infusion for treating chronic diarrhea, uterine and stomach spasms, hemorrhoids and poison oak. An alcohol extract from the roots is used externally to treat sore throats, inflamed gums, spongy gums with loose teeth, inflammation of the mouth such as gingivitis or ulcers.

Skirret (Sium sisarum): Fresh young shoots have been said to be of a cleansing nature when eaten and while easily digested, encourages urination. It may also help chest complaints. The root is diuretic and has been used to remove bladder obstructions, treat dropsy, relieve liver problems and jaundice.

 

Skunk Cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus (Spathyema foetida)): The roots are used to treat coughs, bronchitis, catarrh, asthma, whooping cough, rheumatism and dropsy. It has been employed to treat nervous disorders, fevers, epilepsy, headaches, vertigo and to stop bleeding.  . 

Slippery Elm (Ulmus fulva): The moist inner bark was used to make a tea for digestive problems, particularly diarrhea. When soaked in hot water the inner bark produces a mucilage that is soothing and nourishing and is considered to be one of the best remedies for healing inflammations of the gastro-intestinal tract. It may be used for gastritis, gastric or duodenal ulcers, enteritis, colitis and chronic cystitis. Slippery Elm has been touted for all kinds of chest conditions and has a soothing effect on everything from coughs and bronchitis to pleurisy and tuberculosis. The powdered bark makes a nourishing drink for convalescents and those recovering from gastro-intestinal illnesses. The mucilage from the bark, applied externally softens the skin and protects it from chapping. The bark also makes an excellent poultice for burns, boils, abscess or ulcers and has a “drawing” effect on boils and splinters.                          

Smartweed (Polygonum hydropiper): The flowering heads and leaves are used as an infusion to stem bleeding and relieve menstrual pain.  A cold water infusion was once  used for gravel, dysentery, coughs, sore throats, colds, and gout. Externally, a formulation is used for chronic ulcers and bleeding tumors.  

  Soapwort   (Saponaria officinalis)   Soapwort is mainly used as an expectorant. It is useful in the treatment of bronchitis, coughs and some cases of asthma, gallstones and arthritic and rheumatic pain. Externally, a decoction made from the roots, makes a soothing wash for eczema and other skin conditions and may be applied to poison ivy and poison oak.

 Solomon Seal (Polygonatum multiflorum also P. odoratum((synP.officinale)) This is given in pulmonary consumption and bleeding of the lungs. It is also used for menstrual irregularities, cramps, piles, chronic dysentery and inflammation of the stomach and bowels. It was also used in some cases to treat sore throats, dry and irritable coughs, heart disease and chest pain. Externally, the powdered roots make a poultice for bruises, inflammation and tumors. The flowers and roots were considered to be an aphrodisiac.                          

Sorrel (Rumex acetosa): A tea made from the leaves of sorrel was used to treat kidney and liver ailments and fevers. It is a diuretic, antiseptic and laxative that is sometimes used to stimulate the appetite and prevent scurvy. It is used externally to treat mouth ulcers, boils and infected wounds. Care should be taken in the use of this plant as it is toxic.                                            .

Southernwood   (Artemisia abrotanum): Southernwood was used to treat liver, spleen and stomach problems, to encourage menstruation and kill intestinal worms. It is hardly used medicinally these days except in cases where it is used to make a poultice for wounds, splinters, skin conditions and occasionally to treat frostbite. It is said that it stimulates the gallbladder and bile which in turn improves digestion and liver functions. 

Spiderwort (Tradescantia virginiana): A tea of the root was considered laxative.  It was used for stomachache from overeating and as a diuretic. Externally it was used as a poultice for insect bites.

Spikenard, American (Aralia racemosa): Spikenard is a tonic which is used for indigestion, dysentery, blood diseases, syphilis, ringworm, gout, local pains and some heart problems. A pleasant syrup was made from Spikenard and Elecampane for lung conditions like whooping cough, asthma and general colds. The roots were chewed to make a poultice for wounds and when mixed with wild ginger was used to treat fractures.                         

Spikenard (Nardostachys jatamansi syn N. grandiflora): Internally used for nervous indigestion, insomnia, depression, and tension headaches.  Externally used for rashes and as a deodorant.

Star Anise (Illicium verun): Star anise is used in the East to relieve colic and rheumatism and to flavor cough medicines.  It warms the abdomen, dispels gas, regulates energy, treats belching, vomiting, abdominal pains and hernia

Stone Root (Collinsonia Canadensis): It is known to have an affinity for problems of the rectum and anus. It is given for rectal pains and inflammation and for dysentery with rectal problems. It is recommended when there is not enough circulation in the pelvic region. It is a treatment for anal fistulae, rectal ulcers and nervous conditions affecting the rectum. It is also used to counter fluid retention and kidney stones. A syrup from it was once used for inflammation or constriction of the throat, like in cases of laryngitis and chronic coughs also for disorders of the middle ear. An external poultice of the fresh leaves or roots was used for sores, wounds, bruises, inflammation as well as for the relief of poison ivy and poison oak dermatitis.                                          

Sumac (Rhus coriaria): In the Middle East, a sour drink is made from the fruit to relieve stomach upsets.

Sumac, Smooth (Rhus glabra): The berries have diuretic properties, and are used in bowel complaints and febrile disorders. The bark also is used for healing. The bark boiled in milk is used to wash minor burns. When mixed with lard the resultant salve heals burns without leaving any scars. Infusions made with alcohol were rubbed on the limbs to relieve rheumatism and aching muscles. The dried ripe fruit is used in the manufacturing of gargles.

Sweet Birch (Betula lenta):  As a decoction or syrup, it is used as a tonic for dysentery and genito-urinary irritation.  The sap is used to make a medicinal wine and diuretic tea. The juice of the leaves is used to make a gargle for mouth sores and the sap is one of the ingredients of skin lotions.

Sweet Cicely (Myrrhis odorata):.It was used as a gentle stimulant for upset stomachs and was useful for coughs and tuberculosis. The roots are diuretic and have been used as a cough remedy. It increases the appetite and decreases flatulence. A decoction of the roots was used for snake and dog bites and an ointment was made to ease gout and soothe wounds and ulcers.                                           

Sweet Woodruff (Galium odoratum (Asperula odorata): Woodruff leaves were added to wine to aid digestion and to treat liver obstructions and hepatitis. It is a diuretic and has been used to reduce inflammations and bladder stones. It is a light sedative suitable for treating nervous tension in young children and the elderly. The crushed leaves applied to cuts and wounds were said to have a healing effect.  .

Syrian Rue (Peganum harmala): The seeds can be used to counteract depression, stimulate breast milk production and to treat disorders of the eyes. It is also used to treat rheumatism and nervous conditions.

Szechuan Pepper (Zanthoxylum piperitum (Xanthoxylum piperitum)): The berries of Zanthoxylum species are carminative and anti-spasmodic.  Both the bark and berries are stimulants and are used to purify the blood, promote digestion and as an anti-rheumatic.     

 

 

 

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Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

 

 

Tamarind (Tamarindus indica (T. officinalis)): Tamarind is a cleansing fruit that improves digestion, relieves gas, soothes sore throats and acts mildly laxative. It is used to improve the appetite, strengthen the stomach and relieve constipation. It is also used for treating dysentery and for treating colds and other ailments that cause the production of excessive mucus. Externally, a wash made from it is used as eyewash and a treatment for ulcers, while a paste was used for rheumatism. The juice has a reputation of preventing hangovers.

 

Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare): The flowers are used to kill intestinal worms and heal scabies and other skin infections. In very small doses it has been used to treat epilepsy and to encourage menstruation. The oil is applied externally to treat bruises, injuries and rheumatic complaints. The root when preserved with sugar or honey is a very good treatment for gout. The green leaves when pounded and applied to the affected area will relieve sprains and reduce the swelling.

 

Tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus): The leaves have been used to stimulate appetite, settle an upset stomach, promote the menses and as a diuretic. It is chewed to ease a toothache and before taking a bitter medicine. Drinking the tea before bedtime will help with insomnia. It is also used to treat threadworms in children.

Thyme (Thymus spp): Thyme is useful in treating coughs (including whooping cough) and clearing congestion. It makes a good mouthwash for sore throats and infected gums. It is widely used in the pharmaceutical industry as a component in mouthwashes, gargles, cough drops and other products. Thyme improves digestion, destroys intestinal parasites, reduces menstrual cramp, and is good for headaches and uterine problems. It aids stomach weakness and cramps, indigestion and gas.

Tolu Balsam (Myroxylon balsamum var. balsamum): The balsam is used for chronic catarrh, non- inflammatory chest complaints, laryngitis and croup. It is also used as a flavour and mild expectorant in cough syrups and lozenges. It has been used for abscesses, colds, asthma, rheumatism, catarrh, tuberculosis, headaches, venereal diseases, sores, sprains, bronchitis and wounds. It is also used as a bactericide, a fungicide and parasiticide and is used in cases of scabies, ringworm, bed sores and diaper rash.                                                                     

Tonka Bean (Dipteryx odorata): Tonka Bean is cardiac, tonic and narcotic and the fluid extract is used in whooping cough, but large doses could cause paralysis of the heart.  Coumarin derivatives are used as anti-coagulants. Also Carminative, Diaphoretic, Febrifuge, Stimulant, Stomachic.  Classified by FDA as Class 3 herb (To be used only under the supervision of an expert qualified in the appropriate use of this substance).  Allowed in alcoholic beverages in Canada if coumarin-free.

Tormentil Potentilla erecta (Potentilla tormentilla, Tormentilla erecta): It is used internally for diarrhea, enteritis, Crohn’s disease, mucous colitis, ulcerative colitis, gastritis, diverticulitis, peptic ulcer, and inflammation of the colon.  Externally uses are for hemorrhoids, vaginal discharge, sore throat, mouth ulcers, cuts, sores, ulcers, burns, sunburn, frostbite, and shingles.  Care is needed in topical application of strong tannins, which can cause scarring.

Tulip (Tulipa edulis): The bulb is made into a paste and topically applied for lymphatic cancers, nodules, sores, ulcers, boils, and toxic swellings.

Turmeric (Curcuma longa): Turmeric is an agent that stimulates the liver to increase its production of bile.  This yellow brown or green fluid helps emulsify fats in the duodenum and increases peristalsis, the rhythmic contractions that move food through your gastrointestinal tract. Turmeric also stimulates the gallbladder and biliary duct to discharge bile and increases the body’s excretion of cholesterol.  It is useful for preventing and treating gallstones. An infusion of turmeric and milk is useful in aiding the digestion, promoting heart health, protecting the liver and easing the inflammation of arthritis. Turmeric also regulates the menses, relieves menstrual pain, helps to reduce uterine tumors and may reduce blood pressure.

 

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Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

 

 

 

 

Uva Ursi (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi): It has been used extensively in herbal medicine to disinfect and astringe the urinary tract in cases of acute and chronic cystitis and urethritis. If the kidneys are infected however, it is not advisable to use it. It is used in several over the counter skin creams that are sold to treat oral herpes and for irritations caused by vaginal infections. It is useful in treating diabetes for excessive sugar and because of its diuretic properties; it is quite often used in weight loss preparations.

 

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

Valerian (Valeriana officinalis): Valerian root is a tranquilizer used for relieving nervous tension, insomnia, headaches, nervous digestion, irritable bowel syndrome and stomach or menstrual cramps. It may lower blood pressure and strengthen the optic nerve of the eye.

                                                     

Vanilla (Vanilla planiforlia):  Vanilla is considered to have many medical properties and has been used as a stomach herb, a stimulant, an aphrodisiac and an antidote for poison. It also acts on the nervous system and is used to treat hysteria and high fevers.

             

Velvet Bean (Mucuna pruriens):  Velvet Beans have been used in clinical studies to treat Parkinson’s disease. It is considered a tonic and an aphrodisiac to the reproductive system. It may help with improving sexual dysfunction and loss of libido. It may also be used to eliminate intestinal worms.                                                       .

Vervain (Verbena officinalis): Vervain is considered to be a tonic, astringent, diuretic, sedative, antispasmodic and aphrodisiac. It has been used to treat fevers, colds, nervous complaints, skin infections, gout, liver and gallbladder problems, insomnia and uterine cramping. It has also been used to promote menstruation and to increase the production of mother’s milk. For external use, a mouthwash for infected gums and a poultice for wounds or hemorrhoids have been made from it. It should be avoided during pregnancy.

 

Vervain, Blue (Verbena hastata): This is used to treat fevers, colds, flu, hysteria, throat and lung congestion, liver disorders, and irregular menses and cramps. It will eliminate intestinal worms and will increase to its normal operation, poor circulation of the blood. It is a good tonic for persons recovering from acute diseases or illness.   .   

Vetiver (Vetiveria zizanoides): Vetiver roots are taken as a stimulating tonic drink to improve digestion, encourage menstruation, and kill parasites.  It  increases sweating and is useful in treating fevers, flu and rheumatism.

 

Violet (Viola odorata): Violets are antiseptic, diuretic and sedative. An extract from the flowers and roots has been used to treat respiratory disorders, as a diuretic, a gargle and in cough mixtures. Externally, it is used to make poultices for swellings, inflammations, and mumps, to soothe and heal wounds and for swollen or tumorous breasts.

 

Virginia Skullcap (Scutellaria laterifolia): Virgina skullcap has been used for a wide range of nervous disorders, including agitations, insomnia, hysteria, epilepsy, convulsions, St. Vitus dance, anxiety, depression, nervous headaches and muscle cramps. It has also been used to lower blood pressure and cholesterol, treat heart disease and to promote menstruation. It is claimed to be one of the best herbs for breaking addictions and to relieve the problems arising from drug and alcohol withdrawal. 

Virginia Snakeroot (Aristolochia serpentaria): This is a stimulant which is used for rheumatism, gout, arthritis, pneumonia, typhoid, and malaria. It has been used in commercial tonics for the skin, kidneys and circulation. Externally, it is used for pleurisy, herpes; slow healing wounds and is an effective gargle for sore throats.

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

Wahoo (Euonymous atropurpurea): Wahoo bark is considered a gallbladder remedy with laxative and diuretic properties and is used for biliousness and liver problems as well as for skin conditions such as eczema, constipation, heart problems and liver disorders. It has been used externally as an eye lotion or as a poultice for sores and for dandruff and scalp problems.

 

Watercress (Nasturtium officinale): Watercress has high vitamin C content as well as several minerals and is a very valuable treatment in chronic illnesses. It is recommended for catarrh, bronchitis, fluid retention, mucus in the lungs, indigestion and skin problems. The juice or crushed leaves when dabbed on the skin every day is said to remove facial blemishes, when rubbed under the arms is a deodorant and when made into a poultice is used for rheumatism and gout. It is also used to stimulate metabolism, promote bile metabolism and to pass gas. 

                     

White Sage (Salvia apiana):  White Sage is used to treat canker sores, bites and stings, hot flashes, night sweats, sore throats, irregular and light menstruation, bleeding gums, cuts and burns. It is a digestive and nerve tonic which calms and stimulates the nervous system and improves digestion. An infusion of the leaves is used as a blood tonic and as a treatment for coughs and colds. The tea makes a good douche for acute candidal vaginitis and can also be used as a wash for wounds, sores, scrapes and abrasions.                                

Wild Lettuce (Lactuca virosa, L. scariola, L. Canadensis, L. serriola): Wild lettuce helps to calm restlessness and reduces anxiety and is used in the treatment of whooping cough, dry irritating coughs, colic, gastric spasms, fevers, headaches, muscle and joint pains as well as insomnia. The sap is used to treat rashes, warts and acne.                                       
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Wild Onion (Allium cernuum): The bulbs have been used as a stimulant, to increase perspiration and urine flow, to expel intestinal worms, and as a cough remedy. The juice has been used to treat kidney stones, colds, croup and sore throat. As a poultice it is used on the chest for the treatment of respiratory ailments such as chest and pleurisy pain and on other infections such as sores, sore throat and swellings.

Wild Sarsaparilla (Aralia nudicaulis (syn A. medicaulis)): Wild sarsaparilla is a sweet pungent tonic herb that is used to treat pulmonary diseases, asthma, rheumatism and stomach aches. Externally, it is used as a poultice for rheumatism, sores, burns, itchy skin ulcers, eczema and swellings. A remedy made from the roots is used in treating cystitis.                                                                  

Wild Senna (Cassia marilandica (syn Senna marilandica, Cassia marylandica, Cassia medsgeri)):  A decoction of the roots was used in the treatment of fevers and heart problems. The bruised roots have been used as a poultice for sores and the leaves made into a laxative tea. The seed pods can also be used but are weaker and slower in their action. The seeds can be soaked in water until soft and then swallowed for sore throat.                                 . 

Wild Strawberry (Fragaria vesca (F virginiana)): This makes a blood tonic that is used in the treatment of diarrhea, gout, tuberculosis, arthritis, rheumatism, and chronic dysentery. The leaves can be made into a tea that is a diuretic and astringent. In the form of an enema it is used for hemorrhoids and constipation. A poultice made from the leaves and, or berries is used to treat sores, skin blemishes and acne. The fruit is useful in treating liver and kidney complaints. A decoction is used to treat chilblains and as a gargle for the throat.                                                           

Wild Thyme (Thymus serpyllum (syn Thymus angustifolius)): This may be taken as an infusion to treat flu, colds, sore throat, coughs, whooping cough, chest infections and bronchitis. It has decongestant properties and is useful in clearing a stuffy nose, sinusitis, ear congestion and related complaints. It is also used for gas, colic, intestinal worms and to help with hangovers. Externally it may be applied as a wash to heal wounds, ulcers, throat and gum infections, minor injuries and mastitis.                     

Wild Yam (Dioscorea villosa): The herb is antispasmodic and anti-inflammatory and is useful in treating arthritis and rheumatism. It reduces inflammation and pain and relaxes stiff muscles in the affected area. It helps to relieve cramps, muscle tension and colic and can be an effective treatment for digestive problems, including gallbladder inflammation, irritable bowel syndrome and diverticulitis. It is given for uterine pain and is also used for ovarian spasm and inflammation such as occurs with pelvic inflammatory disease. Wild Yam is a primary liver tonic herb which activates and stimulates liver activity.

                                                              

Willow, Black (Salix nigra): Black willow is a safe natural source of aspirin-like chemicals which helps to explain its reputation in the treatment of rheumatism and arthritis where there is much associated pain and inflammation. The bark has been used in the treatment of gonorrhea, ovarian pains and nocturnal emissions. Internally it is used to treat rheumatism, arthritis, gout, diarrhea, dysentery, fevers, neuralgia and headache. The bark can be used as a poultice on cuts, wounds, sprains, bruises and swellings. 

             

Willow, White (Salix alba): This is useful in treating headache, recurring fevers, gonorrhea, ovarian pains, dyspepsia, dysentery, chronic diarrhea, neuralgia, rheumatic

aches and pains, gout,  worms, edema and hay fever. An infusion of the leaves has a calming effect and is helpful in the treatment of nervous insomnia. It is also added to the bath water for relieving widespread rheumatism. The fresh or dried herb is used externally, for making a poultice for infected wounds, ulcerations or eczema.

 

Wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens): Wintergreen is strongly anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and soothing to the digestive system.  It is an effective remedy for rheumatic and arthritic problems and, taken as a tea, it relieves flatulence and colic.  The essential oil, in the form of a liniment or ointment, brings relief to inflamed, swollen, or sore muscles, ligaments, and joints. The leaf tea is given for the same conditions as treated by aspirin, such as colds, flu, fever, muscle pain, arthritis and rheumatism. It is readily absorbed into the skin and makes a skin softener that will smooth rough, callused skin. Commercially, it is used to flavor toothpaste and other dental preparations as well as for other pharmaceuticals.

Witch Hazel (Hamamelis virginiana): A decoction from Witch Hazel was rubbed on cuts, bruises, insect bites, aching joints, sore muscles, and sore backs.  The tea was used to stop internal bleeding, prevent miscarriage, and treat colds, fevers, sore throat and menstrual pain. Witch Hazel is very useful for inflamed and tender skin conditions. It is valuable for damaged facial veins, varicose veins, hemorrhoids and bruises. It is also an effective eyewash for inflammation of the eyes.  .

Woad (Isatis tinctoria): Woad is considered to be a broad-spectrum antibiotic that is used to treat many infections and inflammations. The roots and leaves are used for swollen glands such as in cases of mumps, tonsillitis, or laryngitis. It is also used in treating high fevers, diphtheria, and hepatitis. Because of its high astringency it is rarely given internally  and has only been used as a plaster applied to the region of the spleen and as an ointment for ulcers, dry sore throat, abscesses,  inflammation and to staunch bleeding.

                                             

Wood Apple (Feronia limonia (Feronia elephantum), (Limonia acidissima)): The fruit is used as a liver and cardiac tonic, and, when unripe, as an astringent means of halting diarrhea and dysentery. It is an effective treatment for hiccough, sore throat and diseases of the gums. The pulp as well as the powdered rind is made into poultices and applied to bites and stings of venomous insects.

 

Wood Sage (Teucrium scorodonia (T scordonia)): Wood sage may be used for all infections of the upper respiratory tract, especially for colds and influenza.  It can also be beneficial in some cases of rheumatism. It stimulates the gastric juices thus aiding digestion and relieving flatulent indigestion. Externally it is used to treat wounds, boils and abscesses.

 

Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium): Wormwood leaves primary use is to stimulate the gallbladder, help prevent, and release stones, and to adjust digestive problems. It increases bile and stomach acid production and therefore improves digestion and the absorption of nutrients. It also reduces gas and bloating and expels intestinal worms. As a muscle relaxer it is sometimes added to liniments especially for rheumatism.  

 

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

 

 

Xuan Fu Hua (Inula japnoica (syn I. Britannica var. chinensis)): This is often prescribed for bronchitis, wheezing, chronic coughing, and other chest complaints brought on by “cold conditions” (profuse phlegm, nausea and vomiting, hiccups and flatulence. It also aids the digestive functions.   

 

 

 

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER

Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium): Yarrow flowers encourage circulation, lower blood pressure and help stop bleeding anywhere in the body. Hot yarrow, peppermint and elder flower tea is an old remedy for reducing fevers and treating colds, measles, and eruptive diseases.  It also helps relieve stomach ulcers, urinary tract infections and stones, cramps, rheumatism, intestinal gas, diarrhea, anorexia and hyperacidity. Excessive menstruation, postpartum bleeding and hemorrhoids can be helped by it.

                                  

Yellow Archangel (Lamium galeobdolon (Galeobdolon luteum, Lamiastrum galeobdolon): The crushed leaves bound to open sores will cause rapid healing.

 

Yellow Fawn Lily (Erythronium grandiflorum): The crushed bulbs were used to make a poultice for treating boils. The pulverized root was applied to boils and as a wet dressing on skin sores. The leaf infusion of this plant has been shown to be active against a wide spectrum of bacteria, particularly in topical applications.

 

Yellow Foxglove (Digitalis lutea):  Like other foxgloves, this plant supports a weakened or failing heart, increasing the strength of contraction, slowing and steadying the heart rate and lowering blood pressure by strongly stimulating the production of urine, which reduces overall volume. It is a less toxic than purple foxglove and it is flushed out of the body quicker.

Yellow Jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens): Yellow Jasmine is prescribed in small doses as a sedative and antispasmodic. It is most commonly used to treat neuralgia and is often given for nerve pain affecting the face. Its antispasmodic property is used to treat whooping cough and asthma and it is also used for migraine, insomnia, bowel problems and to reduce blood pressure. A tea made from the flowers was thought to be good for coughs, shortness of breath, pleurisy, stomach pains as well as to help in childbirth.

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Yellow Dock (Rumex crispus): Yellow Dock has been used to treat gout, cystitis, water retention, urinary stones and gravel and has been considered as a tonic for the liver and gallbladder. It contains a high percentage of ascorbic acid and Iron. Decoctions of the plant are useful externally as a treatment for psoriasis, eczema, syphilitic lesions, rashes of the skin and to relieve the discomfort of contact with stinging nettle, poison ivy etc. The roots have diuretic properties which increase urine production and eliminate toxins by way of the urine.

                      

Yellow Poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera (syn Tulipifera liriodendron)):This produces a tea that is used for indigestion, dysentery, rheumatism, coughs, fever, the heart and nervous system, while externally it is used as a wash and poultice on wounds and boils. The root bark and seeds have been used to treat intestinal worms. The buds crushed and mixed with grease provide an ointment used for scalds, burns and inflammations, while the crushed leaves were used as a poultice for headaches.                                                 .

Yellowroot (Xanthorhiza simplicissima (syn Xanthorhiza apiifolia, Zanthorrhiza apifolia)):  An infusion of the root is used to treat mouth ulcers, stomach ulcers, colds, jaundice, digestive disorders and piles. The root is astringent and a blood tonic which helps to stimulate the secretion of bile and may be helpful to persons with cirrhosis of the liver.

Yerba Buena, (Satureja douglasii): This was used as a treatment for colic, fevers, upset stomach, pin worms, arthritis, a blood purifier and tonic. Externally it was used as a skin wash for rashes and prickly heat, and the warm leaves were made into a poultice and held against the jaw for toothaches.

                        

Yerba Mansa (Anemopsis californica): Yerba Mansa is considered a remedy for healing boggy conditions of the mouth, intestinal and urinary tracts and lungs. It is also used to treat ulcers of the stomach and duodenum, and mouth, gum and sore throats. It is antibacterial and antifungal and makes a good external dressing for abrasions or contusions.

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Yerba Mate (Ilex paraguarensis): It is used in popular medicine and employed in commercial herbal preparations as a stimulant to the central nervous system, a diuretic, and an anti rheumatic. Yerba Mate has been used as a diuretic, tonic and a central nervous system stimulant. Its tonic effect on the body helps to regulate sleep cycles and reduce fatigue. Yerba Mate has been recommended for arthritis, headaches, hemorrhoids, obesity, fluid retention, fatigue, constipation, stress, hay fever and allergies. It is also said to cleanse the blood, tones the nervous system, retards aging, stimulate the mind, controls the appetite, and stimulates the production of cortisones.

Yerbe Santa (Eriodictyon californicum): It is an excellent decongestant and is used for any lung or sinus condition that is juicy, hypersecretory and gaggy. It is very useful for chronic gastritis, and chronic urethral irritation. Because it dilates the bronchial tubes, it makes it very useful for asthma and hay fever. It is also used for catarrh of the bladder, hemorrhoids and externally as a poultice for bruises, sprains, wounds and insect bites.   For mild bronchial spasms, smoking the leaves along with the tea can improve the effects.

 

Yew (Taxus baccata (syn T. baccata var. aurea, T. baccata var. fastigiata, T. baccata var. fastigiata-aurea, T. baccata var. washingtonii, T. canadensis var. washingtonii[, T. cuspidate, T. fastigiata): The yew tree is a highly toxic plant that has been used medicinally, on occasions, in the treatment of chest complaints. The leaves have been used to treat asthma, bronchitis, hiccough, indigestion, epilepsy and rheumatism. The young shoots and berries have been used to make a remedy for cystitis, headaches, heart and kidney problems and rheumatism. Externally the leaves have been used in a steam bath for rheumatism.

                                  

Yin Chen Hao (Artemisia capillaries): Yin Chen Hao is an effective remedy for liver problems, particularly hepatitis with jaundice. It is also anti-inflammatory and diuretic. It has a tonic and strengthening effect on the liver, gallbladder and digestive system. An infusion of the young shoots is used internally to treat jaundice, hepatitis, gall bladder complaints and illnesses accompanied by fever. It is used externally for making a plaster to treat headaches.

 

Yohimbe (Pausinystalia yohimbe (Coryanthe yohimbe)): Yohimbine is an agrenergic blocker and has a long-standing reputation as a sexual stimulant. Yohimbe contains the compound yohimbine a major ingredient in several prescription drugs for impotence. The concentrate yohimbine, occasionally increases heartbeat, raises blood pressure or increase irritability, nervousness, depression or dizziness. It should only be used under the supervision of a professional, if one has high blood pressure or diabetes.

Yuan Zhi (Polygala tenuifolia): Yuan Zhi contains triterpenoid saponins that promote the clearing of phlegm from the bronchial tubes. The plant is used mainly as an expectorant and stimulant to treat bronchial asthma, chronic bronchitis and whooping cough. . It has been used to treat coughs with profuse phlegm, bronchitis, insomnia, palpitations, poor memory, anxiety, depression and nervous tension. Externally it is used to treat boils and carbuncles. The leaves are used as a tonic for the heart and kidneys.

 

Yucca (Yucca filamentosa, Y baccata, Y arizonica, Y elaza, Y whipplei ssp caespitosa):  Yucca is used for arthritis, rheumatism, gout, urethritis and prostates.  At one time it was considered an important source of phytosterols and used in the manufacturing of steroidal hormones.  Y glauca has been shown to have some activity against one strain of melanoma. 

 

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Each of the products described within Our Web Site is being sold as a dietary supplement in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The herbal and health information provided in this Web Site is intended for educational purposes only. The products described are intended solely as food and dietary supplements to enhance general health. Nothing listed within this Web Site should be considered as medical advice for dealing with a given problem. You should consult your health care professional for individual guidance for specific health problems. Persons with serious medical conditions should seek professional care.

 

Zedoary (Curcuma zedoaria (round) C. zerumbet (long): Zedoary is useful in flatulent colic and debility of the digestive organs, though it is rarely employed, and is valued for its ability to purify the blood. It is an antiseptic and a paste applied locally to cuts and wounds helps healing. It is rich in starch and is sometimes fed to babies and invalids. It is used as an ingredient in cold preparations. Mixed with cream it makes a good face mask that keeps the skin clear.

  

Zhe Bei Mu (Fritillaria thunbergii (syn F. callicola, F. verticillata, Uvularia cirrhosa)):   Zhe bei mu increases the coughing up of mucus and relieves irritability in the respiratory tract.  It is used to treat bronchitis and tonsillitis, and for fever and respiratory symptoms such as flu. Zhe bei mu is thought to act specifically on tumors and swellings of the throat, neck, and chest, and is taken for thyroid gland nodules, scrofula (tuberculosis of the lymph glands of the neck), abscesses and boils. It has also been used to treat dysentery, and to increase breast-milk production. This remedy should only be used under the supervision of a qualified practitioner as excessive doses can cause breathing difficulties and heart failure.

 

Zhi Mi (Anemarrhena asphodeloides): Internally, it is used for high fevers in infectious diseases, tuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, urinary problems, night sweats and coughs. It is used externally as a mouthwash for mouth ulcers. It should not be given to patients suffering from diarrhea and should be taken with care, as when taken in excess, it can cause a sudden drop in blood pressure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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